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TANACIO, JENNIFER S. MARCH 2006. La Trinidad, Benguet Meat Vendors’

Level of Knowledge on FMD, Attitudes Towards and Perceptions on FMD Information Campaign

Adviser: Anna Liza B. Wakat, BSc

ABSTRACT

The study was conducted to assess La Trinidad, Benguet meat vendors’ level of knowledge on FMD, attitudes towards and perceptions on FMD information campaign. It aimed to characterize the respondents of the study, to determine the respondents’ sources of information about FMD, to rate the respondents’ knowledge level about FMD, to determine the respondents’ attitude towards the campaign, and to determine the preferred language and medium of information dissemination about Foot and Mouth Disease.

Data were gathered with the use of an interview schedule from 25 respondents and were analyzed using frequency and percentages.

Most of the respondents belonged to the age bracket 16-25 with more males than females; most of them had formal education and married.

Findings show that the meat vendors were slightly knowledgeable on the symptoms and affected animals of the disease. For its control measures, treatment and mode of transfer, majority were not knowledgeable. For its effect on humans, majority were highly knowledgeable since they know that this has no effect on humans’ health so long as it is cooked well before eating.

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according to them, it promotes sanitation and safety and it helps in providing great income. With this, they were willing to support the Foot and Mouth Disease Information Campaign (FMDIC) by practicing the control measures and letting others know about the campaign through sharing the information they have learned.

The respondents claimed that the campaign was helpful since it could help increase pork’s productivity and it helps for a healthy swine production.

For information dissemination, seminar is most preferred for they can freely ask questions and express their views or ideas to the lecturer. Iloko is the most preferred language fort broadcast, while English for print.

Some of the respondents claimed that they were unaware of the information Campaign.

Recommendations

Based on the conclusions, the following recommendations were made;

1. The Department of Agriculture specially the Bureau of Animal Industry should provide enough information on FMD to be aired on radio stations so that the respondents will be updated and will gain knowledge about the disease and the campaign;

2. FMD information can be localized-translated in Iloko and aired on cable channels and radio, and;

3. Seminars should be conducted for meat vendors so they will be informed and they could ask questions regarding RFMD.

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Page

Bibliography . . . . . . i

Abstract . . . . . . . . i

Table of Contents . . . . . iii

INTRODUCTION . . . . . 1

REVIEW OF LITERATURE FMD History . . . . . . 5

Strains of FMD . . . . . . . . 5

FMD Task Force . . . . . 5

FMD Absent for the First Time . . . . . . 6

Control Measures . . . . . . . . . 6

Mode of Transfer . . . . . . . . . . 6

Affected Animals . . . . . . 6

Preferred Language and Media. . . . . . . . 8

METHODOLOGY Locale and Time of the Study . . . . 9

Respondents of the study . . . . 9

Data Collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Data Gathered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Data Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

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Respondents’ Profile . . . . . . . . . . 13

Sources of Information Regarding FMD Symptoms and Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Knowledge Level About FMD. . . . . . . 15

Respondents’ Attitude Towards the FMDIC . . . . . . . . . 17

Perception Towards FMDIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Media and Language Preferences for FMD Information Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

LITERARURE CITED . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

APPENDICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

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INTRODUCTION

Rationale

One of the information campaigns conducted in the country with nationwide coverage was on Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD). The Department of Agriculture particularly the National Foot and Mouth Disease Task Force (NFMDTF)- the first task force in the Philippines that deals with animal disease conducted this information campaign. It is under the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) and implements the National Program for the control and Eradication of FMD in the Philippines (Anonymous, 2005).

The FMD Task Force had several activities on FMD information dissemination.

They had School - on the - Air (SOA) Program, which was aired weekly at DZWT in 2000; the Bureau of Animal Industry provided other topics tackled, which was in Manila.

Also, the Philippine Information Agency (PIA) produced radio plugs regarding FMD and sponsored a play, which was held at Melvin Jones Grandstand, Burnham Park Baguio City (Sabado, 2005).

Aside from using radio to inform the people, they also used print media particularly the Baguio Midland Courier where some articles regarding FMD were published. Magazines, leaflets, and comics were also used. Interviews on FMD were also done during the KAPIHAN Program (Sabado, 2005).

At present the Livestock Sector in coordination with the FMD Task Force under the Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI) is conducting an Emergency Preparedness System (EMPRES) Seminar. A one-day seminar for certain disease such as FMD is an essential component for future development of the livestock industries of all countries that wish to trade internationally in livestock and non-livestock product. This seminar is on going by

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province. Other means of information campaigns were done through billboards, leaflets and brochures and FMD stickers with super pig, the FMD task Force mascot as the highlight (Sabado, 2005).

According to Pangasinan Star (2005), Lingayen Pangasinan and the rest of Ilocos region, including Cordilleras are all set to be officially declared Foot and Mouth Disease Free on December 16,2005 (Pangasinanstar.blogspot.com, 2005).

FMD outbreaks in 2005 recorded a low of 41 outbreaks. A 67% decrease compared to the previous year of 2004 with 123 outbreaks. FMD continued to haunt Benguet Province (4 outbreaks) during the first quarter of the year. With vigilance in monitoring and adherence in the control policies in key livestock premises specifically in the slaughterhouse of Baguio, FMD cases were last reported on April 7, 2005 (Jayme, 2005).

If there will be no FMD case after April 7, 2006, Benguet will be declared as FMD free? Are FMD and FMDIC known by the people? To answer this issues this study aimed to answer the following questions:

1. What is the socio- demographic profile of the respondents?

2. What are the respondents’ sources of information about the FMD?

3. What is the knowledge level of the respondents’ about FMD?

4. What are the attitudes of the respondents towards the FMD Information Campaign?

5. What are the perceptions of the respondents towards the FMD Information Campaign?

6. What are the preferred language and medium of information about FMD?

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Objectives of the Study The study aimed to:

1. Characterize the respondents of the study;

2. Determine the respondents’ sources of information about FMD;

3. Rate the respondents’ knowledge level about FMD;

4. Determine the respondents’ attitude towards the campaign;

5. List the perceptions of the respondents towards the campaign, and;

6. Determine the preferred language and medium of information dissemination about the Foot and Mouth Disease.

Importance of the Study

Results of the study are expected to help the FMD Task Force in evaluating the information campaigns conducted and will help them to determine if there is a need to conduct more information campaigns.

Scope and Limitation

The study was conducted December 2005 – January 2006 in La Trinidad Benguet.

Only 25 meat vendors who had at least one year experience in selling meat in the said area were the respondents. Purposive sampling was used in choosing the respondents.

The information gathered were on the respondents’ profile, respondents’ sources of information about FMD, level of knowledge about FMD,attitude towards the campaign, their perception on the campaign and the preferred language and medium of information dissemination.

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The study did not include evaluation of the content of the different materials used in the information campaign.

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REVIEW OF LITERATURE

FMD History

The first FMD documented case in the country was in 1902. The record of the city veterinarian of Manila showed three cases of FMD in the shipment of animal meat from Hong Kong, which was infected upon arrival in Manila. The disease spread to 25 provinces and continued until 1910. In 1911, it was reported only in the ports of entry, especially among cattle that arrived from Hong Kong. During the next 80 years, periodic epidemics occurred at 8-10 year intervals, between which there was little disease. As of December 1995, out of the 29 provinces were classified as endemic (high incidence), mesoendemic (moderate incidence) and sporadic (low incidence) (Anonymous, 2005).

Strains of FMD

There are seven known strains of FMD virus that three have been reported in the Philippines over the last 80 years. Since 1994, however the current strain in the country is serotype (O) and it may only affect pigs severely. There have been very few reports of affected carabao or cattle and the few that have occurred have been very mild (Anonymous, 2005).

FMD Task Force

The National Foot and Mouth Disease Task Force is the first task force in the Philippines that deals with animal disease. It is under the Bureau of Animal Industry and implements the National Program for the Control and Eradication of FMD in the

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Philippines. It is a nationwide network of Regional FMD Task Forces. Regional FMD Task Forces still exist in mainland Luzon while FMD coordinators are maintained in FMD-free areas as point persons in the FMD Prevention Campaign (Anonymous, 2005).

FMD Absent for the First Time

First in ten years this was the observation of government veterinarians as the absence of FMD reports breached the three-month period last July 27. National FMD Task Force Head Dr. Victor Atienza welcomed the development but cautioned that complacency should not creep in. The NFMDTF received a total 37 report as of July 27.

Last year, the NFMDTF received already 75 cases. Most of the premises affected in the current FMD reports were slaughterhouse, and backyard farms. Disease investigations showed that majority of infection were caused by slaughterhouses, other includes fomites, swill, stockyard holding yard, viajeros/livetock traders and auction market (Anonymous, 2005).

Control Measures

Vaccination It is the most convenient and effective strategy to prevent sickness

and maintain health status of animals in areas of high prevalence (Anonymous, 2005).

Quarantine. Since FMD is transmitted directly and indirectly through people or

inanimate objects, controlling livestock movement is important. To avoid transfer of animals from FMD-infected areas, the government has set-up checkpoints. People, animals and vehicles coming to a non-infected area are checked. Vehicles are cleaned and

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sprayed with disinfectants. Footbath for people are available at all entrances (Anonymous, 2005).

Symptoms. Initially, affected pigs have a fever, do not eat and are reluctant to move. They

may have arched backs and red sore feet. On the snout and the feet, blisters or vesicles may be seen. These vesicles rapture over a few days t6o heal over. As the pigs recover it may be difficult to detect any abnormalities unless the snout and feet are examined closely. Recovered pigs can still excrete virus up to 30 days (Benigno et.al, 2002).

Mode of Transfer

The virus is shed in large amounts from all discharges from infected stock even if not showing symptoms. Spread can occur to other stock by direct contact with these discharges, ruptured vesicles, saliva, breath, feces, urine, and milk or by indirect contact by contacting objects which have been contaminated but discharges from infected stocks such as meat, blood, offal, hides, vehicles, bedding, clothing, footwear, feet and hay (Benigno et. al, 2002).

Affected animals

FMD affects all cloven-hoofed animals. So it does not affect horses, dogs, cats, and people but affects pigs, sheep, goats, carabao and cattle. Ruminants also include that of the family camiladae, where camels belong (Benigno et. al, 2002)

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Preferred Language and Media

For broadcast Iloko was the most preferred language by the respondents and English for print.

Seminar is most preferred for information dissemination.

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METHODOLOGY

Locale and time of the study

The study was conducted in Benguet; it has 13 municipalities and is composed of different tribes, which include Kankana-ey and Ibaloi (Figure 1).

Specifically, the study was conducted in La Trinidad, which is one of the 13 municipalities of Benguet, and is chosen to be the study area (Figure 2), because it was once affected by the outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease and it was one of the area where the Information Campaign on FMD was conducted.

La Trinidad is the capital of Benguet, and it is a first class municipality. It is known to be the “Strawberry Capital of the Philippines”. Benguet State University (BSU) is also found in the area, which is the only State University. The La Trinidad Vegetable Trading post is also found in the area.

The study was conducted December 2005- January 2006.

Respondents of the Study

There were 25 respondents who are meat vendors for the study; purposive sampling method was used in choosing the respondents. The criteria used in choosing them were: the respondent may not be a resident of the area as long as he or she is a meat vendor for at least one year.

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Figure 1. Map of Benguet showing the locale of the study

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Map of La Trinidad, Benguet

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Data Collection

An interview schedule was used in gathering the necessary information. The researcher personally interviewed the respondents and explained the questions foe accurate and clear answers.

Data Gathered

The data gathered were on the respondents’ personal data, respondents’ source of information about FMD, respondents’ level of knowledge about FMD, respondents’

attitude towards the campaign, respondents’ perception on the campaign and the preferred language and medium of information dissemination.

Data Analysis

The data gathered was consolidated and analyzed using descriptive statistics such as frequency and percentages.

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RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Respondents’ Profile

Table 1 presents the personal profile of the 25 meat vendors in La Trinidad, Benguet, which include age, sex, educational attainment and civil status. Forty percent or 10 respondents belonged to the age bracket 16-25 years. There were more male (80%) than female (20%) respondents and most of them were married (56%). This shows that most of the meat vendors selling in the said area were young to middle-aged adults.

It also shows that most of the respondents had formal education with 48% who reached secondary level and only one of them (4%) graduated from a vocational course.

Table 1. Demographic Profile of Meat Vendors in La Trinidad, Benguet CHARACTERISTCS FREQUENCY

N=25

PERCENTAGE (%) Age

16-25 10 40

26-35 6 24

36-45 7 28

46-60 2 8

Sex

Male 20 80

Female 5 20

Civil Status

Married 14 56

Single 11 44

Educational Attainment

Elementary 4 16

High School 12 48

College 8 32

Vocational 1 4

Total 25 100

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Sources of Information Regarding FMD Symptoms and Prevention

Table 2 presents the respondents’ sources of information regarding Foot and Mouth Disease.

Among the 25 respondents, 32% got their information from radio and some or 12% from a seminar on Foot and Mouth Disease that was conducted by veterinarians.

Radio had the highest percentage because of its easy access and they can work while listening to it. It was observed that meat vendors usually listen to radio program while in their meat booths. This strengthens the characteristics of the radio that according to Jamias (1975), it fulfills certain psychological needs because radio listening is easier to do than reading or viewing movies or television. People can listen to it while working;

radio is more understood, more entertaining and more personal.

Table 2. Sources of Information of meat vendors on FMD

SOURCES FREQUENCY N=25

PERCENTAGE (%)

Radio 8 32

Television 7 28

Newspaper 4 16

Seminar 3 12

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Knowledge Level about FMD

Table 3 presents the respondents’ knowledge level on the Foot and Mouth Disease regarding its symptoms, control measures, treatment, and mode of transfer, affected animals and its effect on humans.

Respondents were said to be “not knowledgeable” because they did not enumerate any of the symptoms, treatment, safety measures, mode of transfer, affected animals or its effect on humans. For the “slightly knowledgeable”, respondents mentioned at least two to three correct answers and for the “highly knowledgeable”, respondents mentioned four to five or they gave all the correct answers of what was being asked.

Table 3. La Trinidad meat vendors’ knowledge level on the symptoms and prevention of FMD

NK F P

N=25 (%)

SK F P N=25 (%)

HK F P N=25 (%)

Symptoms 5 20 16 64 4 16

Control measures 15 60 9 36 1 4

Treatment 18 72 6 24 1 4

Mode of Transfer 13 52 9 36 3 12

Affected animals 12 48 13 52 - -

Effect on humans 2 8 -__ - 23 92 Legend:

* NK- Not Knowledgeable

* SK- Slightly Knowledgeable

* HK- Highly Knowledgeable

* F- Frequency

* P- Percentage

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Symptoms. Majority (64%) of the respondents were slightly knowledgeable on the

symptoms because they enumerated some of it like, fever, sore feet and black spots on the mouth area, while 20% were not knowledgeable because they did not know any of the symptoms of the disease.

Control Measures. On the control measures, majority 60%) of the respondents

were not knowledgeable since they were not familiar with the imposed control measures, while there was only one who was highly knowledgeable because he was aware of the control measures such as vaccination, quarantine and isolation of infected swine.

Treatment. On its treatment majority (72%) of the respondents were not

knowledgeable, this is because they were not swine raisers, so they were not familiar with the symptoms so it followed on the treatment.

Mode of Transfer. On the mode of transfer, majority or 52% were not

knowledgeable, while 12% were highly knowledgeable because they have attended some seminar and were somehow aware of the disease.

Affected animals and its effect on humans. With regards to animals being affected

with FMD 52% said that aside from pig, other animal such as cattle is also affected thus they were slightly knowledgeable. On its effect on humans, 92% were highly knowledgeable because according to them this disease has no effect on humans’ health as long as the meat is cooked well if to be eaten. The respondents answered correctly because FMD has no effect on humans, although humans can be a carrier of the disease.

People can spread FMD by carrying the virus through their hands, feet and clothing. This is called mechanical transmission through fomites.

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Respondents’ Attitude towards the FMDIC

Table 4 presents the respondents attitude towards the Foot and mouth Disease Information campaign (FMDIC). All or 100% of the respondents were in favor of the control measures for FMD. On their reasons for favoring it, majority or 76% said it promotes sanitation and safety. Other reasons were it helps in upgrading better quality of meat products and it helps provide great income. It shows that their reasons were all connected to their business as meat vendors.

Table 4. La Trinidad meat vendors’ reason for favoring the FMDIC

REASONS FRREQUENCY N=25

PERCENTAGE (%)

It promotes sanitation and safety 19 76

It helps in upgrading better quality of meat vendors

6 24

It helps provide great income 4 16

*Multiple responses

Table 5 presents the respondents’ ways of supporting the campaign. Out of the 25 respondents, 23 of them were willing to support the campaign by practicing the control measures (52%) and 4% will let others know about the campaign. The other two respondents were not willing to support the campaign because control measures were expensive like vaccination and passing through slaughterhouses for butchering.

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Table 5. La Trinidad meat vendors’ ways of supporting the FMDIC Ways on how to support the FMDIC FREQUENCY

N=25

PERCENTAGE (%)

By practicing the control measures 13 52

By recommending to others 12 48

By sharing the information to others 1 4

*Multiple responses

Table 6. La Trinidad meat vendors’ reasons for sharing and not sharing the FMDIC

REASONS FREQUENCY N=25

PERCENTAGE (%) Reasons for sharing

So that others will be given precautions for FMD

14 56 So that others will also gain knowledge about the

campaign

13 52

So that others will also share 4 16

Reasons for not sharing

Didn’t understand the control measures of the

information campaign 1 4

Not interested 1 4

*Multiple responses

Table 6 presents the respondents’ reasons for sharing and not sharing the FMD Information Campaign. Among the 25 respondents, 23 (92%) of them were willing to share the campaign and two (8%) were not willing. Reason for sharing was, so that they

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will be given precautions for FMD occurrence (56%) and 4% said, so that they will also share to others.

The reasons for not sharing were that, the respondents did not understand the control measures and he was not interested.

Perception on the FMDIC

Table 7 presents the respondents’ perceptions towards the FMDIC. All (100%) of the respondents claimed that the campaign was helpful, because it could help to increase pork productivity (48%) and it could help for a healthy swine production (44%). This means that respondents were aware of the economic effects of FMD and they see the importance of the campaign in their business.

Table 7. La Trinidad meat vendors’ perceptions towards the FMDIC

HELPFULNESS OF THE CAMPAIGN FREQUENCY

N=25

PERCENTAGE (%)

It helps to increase pork productivity 12 48

It helps for a healthy swine production 11 44

For consumers’ safety and precaution 6 24

*Multiple responses

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Media and language preferences for FMD Information Campaign

Table 8 presents the preferred media for the information dissemination on FMD Information campaign. Majority or 60% of the respondents preferred a seminar for information dissemination so that they could interact with the lecturers by asking questions and expressing their ideas. Next is television (52%) while only 12% preferred billboards.

Table 8. La Trinidad meat vendors’ preferred media for FMD information dissemination MEDIA FREQUENCY

N=25

PERCENTAGE (%)

Seminar 15 60

Television 13 52

Radio 7 28

Newspaper 4 16

Billboards 3 12

*Multiple responses

Table 9 presents the respondents’ preferred language for information dissemination of FMD. For broadcast, 60% preferred Iloko since it is the common language used in the area, while for print, 44% preferred English and 40% Filipino since they claimed that these languages were easy to understand.

This coincides with the study of Paulino (2003), on AM and FM station Listenership in Barangay Palina, Kibungan Benguet, that the respondents said that they

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would like Iloko as a medium of communication to be used in airing such programs so that they can easily understand the message.

Table 9. Preferred language in Information Dissemination

PREFERRED LANGUAGE FREQUENCY

N=25

PERCENTAGE (%) Broadcast

Iloko 15 60

English 5 20

Filipino 5 20

Print

English 11 44

Filipino 10 40

Iloko 2 16

*Multiple responses

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SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Summary

The study was conducted in La Trinidad Benguet, aimed to characterize the respondents to determine the respondents’ sources of information about the Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD), to rate the respondents’ knowledge level about FMD, to determine the respondents’ attitude towards the campaign and to list the perceptions of the respondents towards the campaign, to determine the preferred language and medium of information dissemination about Foot and mouth Disease.

Data were gathered with the use of an interview schedule from 25 meat vendors and were analyzed using frequency and percentages.

Most of the respondents belonged to the age bracket 16-25 with more males than females; most of them had formal education and married.

Findings show that the meat vendors were slightly knowledgeable on the symptoms and affected animals of the disease. For its control measures, treatment and mode of transfer, majority were not knowledgeable. For its effect on humans, majority were highly knowledgeable since they knew that FMD has no effect on humans’ health as long as the meat is cooked well before eating.

The meat vendors were in favor of the control measures for FMD because according to them, it promotes sanitation and safety and it helps in providing great income. With this, they were willing to support the Foot and mouth information campaign (FMDIC) by practicing the control measures and letting others know about the campaign through sharing the information they have learned.

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The respondents claimed that the campaign was helpful since it could help increase pork productivity and it helps for a healthy swine production.

For information dissemination, seminar is most preferred for they can freely ask questions and express their views or ideas to the lecturer. Iloko is the most preferred language for broadcast, while English for print.

Some of the respondents claimed that they were unaware of the information Campaign.

Conclusions

Based on the findings presented, the following conclusions are derived:

1. most of the respondents belonged to the age bracket 16-25, high school graduates and were married;

2. radio was the main source of information about the FMD symptoms and preventions;

3. meat vendors needed more information on FMD since the study found out that meat vendors were either not knowledgeable or slightly knowledgeable on its effect, symptoms, affected animals, control measures, treatment and mode of transfer;

4. respondents were in favor and willing to support and share the campaign;

5. they claimed that the campaign s\was helpful;

6. for broadcast, Iloko is the most preferred language to be used while English and Filipino for print; and

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7. Seminar was the most preferred medium for FMD information dissemination.

Recommendations

Based on the conclusions, the following recommendations are made;

1. The Department of Agriculture specially the Bureau of Animal Industry should provide enough information on FMD to be aired on radio stations so that the respondents will be updated and will gain knowledge about the disease and the campaign;

2. FMD information can be localized-translated in Iloko and aired on cable channels and radio, and;

3. Seminars should be conducted for the meat vendors so they will be informed and they could ask questions regarding RFMD.

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LITERATURE CITED

BENIGNO,C.C. et.al . Bureau of Animal Industry.2002 Foot and Mouth Disease Handbook for Field Officers. DA-BAI: Quezon City.

JAMIAS, J.F. 1975. Redaing in Development Communication. University of the Philippines Laguna. Depertment of Developmet Communication.P.92.

JAYME, I.S.2006. The FMD Monitor.Vol.9 (3):3

ANONYMOUS.2005.BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY.2002.FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE HANDBOOK FOR FIELD OFFICERS.DA-BAI, Quezon City, Pp1-4 ANONYMOUS.2005.NATIONAL FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE TASK

FORCE.nd.GVU’s 8th WWW user survey. Retrieved October 2005 http://www.fmdtaskforce.org.ph2005

MANUAL ON FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE-DEPARTMENT OF

AGRICULTURE.nd. Foot and mouth Disease Control and Management.DA-RFU- CAR, Guisad Baguio City.Pp.1

PANGASINAN STAR.2006.retrieved March 2006 from

Pangasinanstar.blogspot.com/2005_12_18_pangasinanstar_archive.html SABADO, J.2005. Programs of FMD Task Force (personal interview)

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APPENDICES Benguet State University COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE Department of Extension Education

La Trinidad, Benguet

Nestor Fongwan Municipal Mayor La Trinidad, Benguet

Sir:

Warm Greetings!

I am Jennifer S. Tanacio, a fourth year student of BS in Development Communication at Benguet State University. I am presently conducting my Undergraduate Thesis ( DevC 200), titled “Level of Knowledge on FMD, Attitudes and Perceptions of Meat Vendors on FMD Information Campaign”.

In this regard, please allow me to conduct a survey among the meat vendors within La Trinidad, Benguet.

Thank you very much and looking forward on your approval.

Respectfully yours, Jennifer S. Tanacio Researcher

Noted:

Anna Liza B. Wakat Adviser

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Interview Schedule I. Respondent’s Profile

Respondents Number: Sex:______

Age: ______ Civil Status:_____

II. What are your sources of information regarding FMD symptoms and prevention?

_____ leaflets _____ magazines _____ newspaper _____ seminars III. Knowledge Level

Not Knowledgeable

Slightly Knowledgable

Highly

Knowledgable Symptoms

Control measures

Treatment Mode of Transfer

Affected Animals Effect on Human

IV.Attitudes towards the FMDIC

1. Are you in favor of the control measures for FMDIC?

_____ Yes, Why? _____ it promotes sanitation and health safety _____ it helps in upgrading better quality _____ it helps in providing great income _____ others (pls specify)

_____ No, Why? _____ not practical in our place _____ it can’t increase productivity _____ it is time consuming

_____ expensive

_____ others (pls specify) 2. Are you willing to support the FMDIC?

_____ Yes, How? _____ by practicing the control measures _____ by recommending it to others _____ by informing listeners/ viewers _____ others (pls specify)

_____ No, Why? _____ control measures are expensive to avail _____ control measures are impractical _____ control measures are not interesting _____ others (pls specify)

3. Do you share to your neighbors or to anybody the FMD Information

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_____ Yes, Why? _____ so they will inform others

_____ so that they will be given precautions for FMD _____ so that they will share it too

_____ others (pls specify)

_____ No, Why? _____ I didn’t understand the control measures of the information campaign

_____ I’m not interested _____ it is only a waste of time _____ others (pls specify) V.Perceptions towards the FMDIC

1.Is the campaign helpful?

_____ Yes, Why? _____ it helps for a healthy swine production _____ it helps to increase pork productivity _____ others (pls specify)

_____ No, Why? _____ it does not help for a healthy swine production _____ it cannot increase pork productivity

_____ others (pls specify) VI. Preferences

1. What is your preferred medium of information dissemination about the FMDIC?

_____ radio

_____ television program _____ newspaper

_____ magazines _____ seminar _____ fliers _____ stickers _____ billboards

_____ others (pls specify)

2. What language do you prefer most in disseminating FMD Information Campaign?

A. Radio _____ English _____ Fiipino _____ Iloko

_____ others (pls specify) B. Print

_____ English _____ Filipino _____ Ilocano

_____ others (pls specify)

Pigura

Figure 1. Map of Benguet showing the locale of the study
Table 1 presents the personal profile of the 25 meat vendors in La Trinidad,  Benguet, which include age, sex, educational attainment and civil status
Table 2 presents the respondents’ sources of information regarding Foot and  Mouth Disease
Table 4 presents the respondents attitude towards the Foot and mouth Disease  Information campaign (FMDIC)
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