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I N D U S T R I A L E N G I N E E R I N G P R O G R A M COURSE TITLE: OPERATIONS RESEARCH 2 (OPERES2)

2nd Semester, Curriculum Year 2018-2019

Holy Angel University VMs

Vision: To become a role-model catalyst for countryside development and one of the most influential, best-managed Catholic universities in the Asia-Pacific region.

Mission: To offer accessible quality education that transforms students into persons of conscience, competence, and compassion.

School of Engineering and Architecture VMs Vision

A center of excellence in engineering and architecture education imbued with Catholic mission and identity serving as a role-model catalyst for countryside development

Mission

The School shall provide accessible quality engineering and architecture education leading to highly competent professional; continually contribute to the advancement of knowledge and technology through research activities; and support countryside development through environmental preservation and community involvement.

Institutional Student Learning Outcomes (ISLOs) 1. Show effective communication

2. Demonstrate appropriate value and sound ethical reasoning 3. Apply critical and creative thinking

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4. Utilize civic and global learning

5. Use applied and collaborative learning 6. Employ aesthetic engagement

7. Show Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Literacy Program Educational Objectives (PEOs)

Within a few years after graduation, graduates of our BS Industrial Engineering programs are expected to have:

1. Demonstrated technical competence, including design and problem-solving skills, as evidenced by:

 the sound technical designs and systems that conform with existing laws and ethical standards they produced

 the recognition and certification they received for exemplary achievement 2. Shown a commitment to life-long learning as evidenced by:

 the graduate degrees or further studies they pursue

 the professional certifications which are locally and internationally recognized they possess

 the knowledge and skills on recent technological advances in the field they continuously acquire 3. Exhibited success in their chosen profession evidenced by:

 the key level positions they hold or promotions they get in their workplace

 the good track record they possess

 the professional visibility (e.g., publications, presentations, patents, inventions, awards, etc.) they are involved with

 the international activities (e.g., participation in international conferences, collaborative research, employment abroad, etc.) they are engaged with

 the entrepreneurial activities they undertake 4. Manifested faithful stewardship as evidenced by:

 their participation in University-based community extension initiatives as alumni

 their contribution to innovations/ inventions for environmental promotion and preservation, and cultural integration

 their engagement in advocacies and volunteer works for the upliftment of the quality of life and human dignity especially the marginalized

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Relationship of the Program Educational Objectives to the Mission of the School of Engineering & Architecture:

Industrial Engineering Program Educational Objectives (PEOs):

Within a few years after graduation, the graduates of the BS Industrial Engineering program should have:

Mission The School shall provide

accessible quality

engineering and architecture education leading to high professional competence.

The School shall continually contribute to the

advancement of knowledge and technology through research activities.

The School shall support countryside development through environmental preservation and community involvement.

1. Demonstrated professional competence, including design and problem solving skills as evidenced by:

 the sound technical designs and systems that conform with existing laws and ethical standards they produced

 the recognition and certification they received for exemplary achievement

2. Shown a commitment to life-long learning evidenced by:

 the graduate degrees or further studies they pursue

 the professional certifications which are locally and internationally recognized they possess

 the knowledge and skills on recent technological advances in the field they continuously acquire

3. Exhibited success in their chosen profession evidenced by:

 the key level positions they hold or promotions they get in their workplace

 the good track record they possess

 the professional visibility (e.g., publications, presentations, patents, inventions, awards, etc.)

 they are involved with international activities (e.g., participation in international conferences, collaborative research, employment abroad, etc.)

 they are engaged with the entrepreneurial activities they undertake

 

4. Manifested faithful stewardship evidenced by: 

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 their participation in University-based community extension initiatives as alumni

 their contribution to innovations/ inventions for environmental promotion and preservation, and cultural integration

 their engagement in advocacies and volunteer works for the upliftment of the quality of life and human dignity especially the marginalized

Relationship of the Institutional Student Learning Outcomes to the Program Educational Objectives:

PEO 1 PEO 2 PEO 3 PEO 4

ISLO1: Show effective communication  

ISLO2: Demonstrate appropriate value and sound ethical reasoning  

ISLO3: Apply critical and creative thinking   

ISLO4: Utilize civic and global learning  

ISLO5: Use applied and collaborative learning    

ISLO6: Employ aesthetic engagement  

ISLO7: Show Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Literacy   

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BS Industrial Engineering Program Outcomes (POs) After finishing the program students will be able to:

a. Apply knowledge of mathematics, physical sciences, and engineering sciences to the practice of Industrial Engineering.

b. Design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.

c. Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability, in accordance with standards.

d. Function on multidisciplinary teams.

e. Identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.

f. Have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.

g. Demonstrate and master the ability to listen, comprehend, speak, write and convey ideas clearly and effectively, in person and through electronic media to all audiences.

h. Have broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.

i. Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning and to keep current of the development in the field.

j. Have knowledge of contemporary issues.

k. Use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

l. Have knowledge and understanding of engineering and management principles as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments.

m. Engage in service-learning program for the promotion and preservation to local culture and tradition as well as to the community.

n. Design, develop, implement and improve integrated systems that include people, materials, information, equipment and energy.

Relationship of the Engineering Program Outcomes to the Program Educational Objectives:

Industrial Engineering Student Outcomes (SOs)

At the time of graduation, BS Industrial Engineering program graduates should be able to: PEO 1 PEO 2 PEO 3 PEO 4 a. Apply knowledge of mathematics, physical sciences, and engineering sciences to the practice of

Industrial Engineering. 

b. Design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. 

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c. Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and

sustainability, in accordance with standards. 

d. Function on multidisciplinary teams. 

e. Identify, formulate and solve engineering problems. 

f. Have an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. 

g. Demonstrate and master the ability to listen, comprehend, speak, write and convey ideas clearly

and effectively, in person and through electronic media to all audiences. 

h. Have broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global,

economic, environmental, and societal context. 

i. Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning and to keep current of the

development in the field. 

j. Have knowledge of contemporary issues. 

k. Use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. 

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l. Have knowledge and understanding of engineering and management principles as a member and

leader in a team, to manage projects and in multidisciplinary environments. 

m. Ability to design, develop, implement and improve integrated systems that include people,

materials, information, equipment and energy. 

n. Engage in service-learning program for the promotion and preservation to local culture and tradition

as well as to the community. 

Code Descriptor Description

I Introductory Course An introductory course to an outcome

E Enabling Course A course that strengthens the outcome

D Demonstrative Course A course demonstrating an outcome Course Outcomes (COs)

1. Formulate and solve LP problems with multiple objectives.

2. Discuss the fundamental concepts of stochastic processes; and,

3. Apply the concepts and techniques of dynamic programming, decision theory, game theory. queuing theory and Markov theory in solving real- life problems.

a b c d e f g h i J k l m n

CO1.Formulate and solve LP problems with multiple objectives; E

CO2.Discuss the fundamental concepts of stochastic processes; E

CO3.Apply the concepts and techniques of dynamic programming, decision theory, game theory, queuing theory and Markov theory in

solving real life problems. D

I. Course Description : The subject deals with concept and solution approaches of advanced optimization models and their application to engineering.

It includes goal programming, dynamic programming, decision theory, game theory, Markov models and queuing theory.

II. Course Credit : 3 Units

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III. Prerequisite : Operations Research 2 (OPSRES2)

IV. Textbook : Anderson, D. R. (2019).An introduction to management science: Quantitative approaches to decision making. (14thEd.).

Australia: Cengage Learning.

V. Requirements : Seatworks

Assignments Boardwork Critiques Case Studies Written Exam

Final Output (Research) VI. Learning Outline

Week/

Hours

CodeCO

Link Learning Output Student

Output Topics / Course Content Core values

Sub valuesand Methodology Evaluation/

Learning Assessment 1 hourWk 1 At the end of course

or topic the student will be able to:

Learn the importance of subject through the course outcomes

Recognize the different classroom policies

Get familiarized with and use the online learning platforms to be used in class

OPSRES2 Subject Orientation

Course outcomes Classroom policies

Attendance

Assignments

Quizzes and major examinations

Case studies

Critique

Subject final output requirement

Grading System

Academic Dishonesty

Christ-

centeredness Indicators:

Obedience and prayerfulness Excellence Indicators:

Competence, expertise, analytical, and logical

Societal responsibility Indicators:

Subject orientation conducted by teacher.

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Online Learning Platform

Canvas LMS

Zoom Cloud Meetings

Commitment andInvolvement

Wk 1-2

5 hours CO1 At the end of course or topic the student will be able to:

Discuss concept of goal programming

Demonstrate how to formulate problems in goal programming problems

Demonstrate the graphical solution in solving for a goal programming problems

Seatwork

Assignment

Written exam

Board Work

Problem Set

Goal Programming Multi- Objective LP Problem

Concept and formulation

Graphical Solution

Christ-

centeredness Indicators:

Obedience and prayerfulness Excellence Indicators:

Competence, expertise, analytical, and logical

Community Indicators:

Solidarity and Respect for others Integrity Indicators:

Accountability,

Transparency and Honesty Societal responsibility Indicators:

Commitment andInvolvement

Media-supported lecture/ PowerPoint presentation

Class discussions by teachers and

students (face-to- face/online)

Interactive student- centered activities like Think-Pair-Share, Brainstorming, Buzz Session etc.

Hands-on

demonstrations and exercises/ problem

setsCoaching (special assistance provided for students learning difficulty in the course)

Recitation

Written examinations

Alternative summative assessments (reflection papers/

critical analysis)

Asynchronous

teaching and learning using Canvas LMS

Answer Key

Assessment Rubric is to be used for theevaluation of theclassroom activities

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Platform in providing offline content

resources (readings, lecture notes,

recorded lectures, detailed guides, etc., in print or digital format) and other activities.

Synchronous

teaching and learning through webinars, live broadcasts, chats and teleconferences for real-time teacher- student engagement.

Wk 3-5

9 hours CO1 CO2CO3

At the end of course or topic the student will be able to:

Define the concepts of dynamic

programming

Demonstrate how to formulate dynamic programming problems

Solve DP problems and apply the principle of optimality

Seatwork

Assignment

Written exam

Board Work

Problem Set

Critique

Dynamic Programming

Concept Properties and Principle of Optimality

Formulation of Deterministic and Probabilistic DP:

Backward and Forward Recursive Equations

Backward and Forward Solution Approaches

Christ-

centeredness Indicators:

Obedience and prayerfulness Excellence Indicators:

Competence, expertise, analytical, and logical

Community Indicators:

Solidarity and Respect for others

Media-supported lecture/ PowerPoint presentation

Class discussions by teachers and

students (face-to- face/online)

Interactive student- centered activities like Think-Pair-Share, Brainstorming, Buzz Session etc.

Hands-on

demonstrations and exercises/ problem

setsCoaching (special assistance provided

Answer Key

Assessment Rubric is to be used for theevaluation of theclassroom activities

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Integrity Indicators:

Accountability,

Transparency and Honesty Societal responsibility Indicators:

Commitment andInvolvement

for students learning difficulty in the course)

Recitation

Written examinations

Alternative summative assessments (reflection papers/

critical analysis)

Asynchronous

teaching and learning using Canvas LMS Platform in providing offline content

resources (readings, lecture notes,

recorded lectures, detailed guides, etc., in print or digital format) and other activities.

Synchronous

teaching and learning through webinars, live broadcasts, chats and teleconferences for real-time teacher- student engagement.

6 P R E L I M E X A M I N A T I O N

Wk 7-9

9 hours CO2

CO3 At the end of course or topic the student will be able to:

Define the basic

Seatwork

Assignment

Written exam

Board Work

Decision Theory

Concept and Decision- Making Scenarios

Certainty and Uncertainty

Christ-

centeredness Indicators:

Obedience and

Media-supported lecture/ PowerPoint presentation

Class discussions by

Answer Key

Assessment Rubric is to

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concepts of decision theory

Understand Certainty and Uncertainty

Scenarios: Perfect Information, Decision- Making Criteria Under Uncertainty

Solve problems involving Decision- making Under Risk:

Bayes' Rule, Posterior Analysis, Decision Trees, Utility Theory

Problem Set

Case Study Scenarios: Perfect Information, Decision- Making Criteria Under Uncertainty

Decision-making Under Risk: Bayes' Rule, Posterior Analysis, Decision Trees, Utility Theory

prayerfulness Excellence Indicators:

Competence, expertise, analytical, and logical

Community Indicators:

Solidarity and Respect for others Integrity Indicators:

Accountability,

Transparency and Honesty Societal responsibility Indicators:

Commitment andInvolvement

teachers and students (face-to- face/online)

Interactive student- centered activities like Think-Pair-Share, Brainstorming, Buzz Session etc.

Hands-on

demonstrations and exercises/ problem

setsCoaching (special assistance provided for students learning difficulty in the course)

Recitation

Written examinations

Alternative summative assessments (reflection papers/

critical analysis)

Asynchronous

teaching and learning using Canvas LMS Platform in providing offline content

resources (readings, lecture notes,

recorded lectures, detailed guides, etc., in print or digital format) and other activities.

be used for theevaluation of theclassroom activities

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Synchronous

teaching and learning through webinars, live broadcasts, chats and teleconferences for real-time teacher- student engagement.

Wk 10-11

6 hours CO2

CO3 At the end of course or topic the student will be able to:

Define the basic concepts and structure of games

Describe a two- person, zero-sum games, and non- zero sum games

Solve problems involving two- person, zero-sum games and non-zero sum games

Seatwork

Assignment

Written exam

Board Work

Problem Set

Critique

Game Theory Decision- Making Under Conflict

Concept and Structure of Games

Solution to Two-Person, Zero-Sum Games

Non-Zero Sum Games

Christ-

centeredness Indicators:

Obedience and prayerfulness Excellence Indicators:

Competence, expertise, analytical, and logical

Community Indicators:

Solidarity and Respect for others Integrity Indicators:

Accountability,

Transparency and Honesty Societal responsibility

Media-supported lecture/ PowerPoint presentation

Class discussions by teachers and

students (face-to- face/online)

Interactive student- centered activities like Think-Pair-Share, Brainstorming, Buzz Session etc.

Hands-on

demonstrations and exercises/ problem

setsCoaching (special assistance provided for students learning difficulty in the course)

Recitation

Written examinations

Alternative summative assessments (reflection papers/

Answer Key

Assessment Rubric is to be used for theevaluation of theclassroom activities

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Indicators:

Commitment andInvolvement

critical analysis)

Asynchronous

teaching and learning using Canvas LMS Platform in providing offline content

resources (readings, lecture notes,

recorded lectures, detailed guides, etc., in print or digital format) and other activities.

Synchronous

teaching and learning through webinars, live broadcasts, chats and teleconferences for real-time teacher- student engagement.

12 M I D T E R M E X A M I N A T I O N

Wk 13-15

9 hours CO2

CO3 At the end of course or topic the student will be able to:

Define the basic concepts of waiting lines

Identify the various objectives that may be set for the operation of a waiting line.

Evaluate the situations that

Seatwork

Assignment

Written exam

Board Work

Problem Set

Case Study

Oral

Presentation

Queuing Theory

Definition, Basic Elements and Properties

Queuing Models with Poisson Input and Output:

Self-service, Single and Multiple

Servers

Christ-

centeredness Indicators:

Obedience and prayerfulness Excellence Indicators:

Competence, expertise, analytical, and logical

Media-supported lecture/ PowerPoint presentation

Class discussions by teachers and

students (face-to- face/online)

Interactive student- centered activities like Think-Pair-Share, Brainstorming, Buzz Session etc.

Hands-on

Answer Key

Assessment Rubric is to be used for theevaluation of theclassroom activities

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generate queuing problems

Demonstrate how to solve queuing problems using standard queuing equations in a self- service, single- channel and multiple-channel servers.

Community Indicators:

Solidarity and Respect for others Integrity Indicators:

Accountability,

Transparency and Honesty Societal responsibility Indicators:

Commitment andInvolvement

demonstrations and exercises/ problem

setsCoaching (special assistance provided for students learning difficulty in the course)

Recitation

Written examinations

Alternative summative assessments (reflection papers/

critical analysis)

Asynchronous

teaching and learning using Canvas LMS Platform in providing offline content

resources (readings, lecture notes,

recorded lectures, detailed guides, etc., in print or digital format) and other activities.

Synchronous

teaching and learning through webinars, live broadcasts, chats and teleconferences for real-time teacher- student engagement.

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Wk 16-17

6 hours CO2

CO3 At the end of course or topic the student will be able to:

Identify the basic concepts of Markov analysis

Describe the components of a Markov chain

Demonstrate the elements of matrix multiplication as the solution technique in Markov analysis

Demonstrate how Markov analysis is useful in the solution of a wide range of managerial problems

Apply the concepts of Markov analysis in managerial and engineering problems

Seatwork

Assignment

Written exam

Board Work

Problem Set

Oral

Presentation

Markov Theory

Definition, Characteristics and Assumptions

Components of a Markov Chain

Classification of States

Markov Decision Processes

Christ-

centeredness Indicators:

Obedience and prayerfulness Excellence Indicators:

Competence, expertise, analytical, and logical

Community Indicators:

Solidarity and Respect for others Integrity Indicators:

Accountability,

Transparency and Honesty Societal responsibility Indicators:

Commitment andInvolvement

Media-supported lecture/ PowerPoint presentation

Class discussions by teachers and

students (face-to- face/online)

Interactive student- centered activities like Think-Pair-Share, Brainstorming, Buzz Session etc.

Hands-on

demonstrations and exercises/ problem

setsCoaching (special assistance provided for students learning difficulty in the course)

Recitation

Written examinations

Alternative summative assessments (reflection papers/

critical analysis)

Asynchronous

teaching and learning using Canvas LMS Platform in providing offline content

resources (readings, lecture notes,

Answer Key

Assessment Rubric is to be used for theevaluation of theclassroom activities

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recorded lectures, detailed guides, etc., in print or digital format) and other activities.

Synchronous

teaching and learning through webinars, live broadcasts, chats and teleconferences for real-time teacher- student engagement.

18 F I N A L E X A M I N A T I O N

Rubric for Assessment

Criteria Excellent (100%) Good (75%) Satisfactory (50%) Needs Improvement (25%)

Content and Organization (40 pts)

In depth and insightful discussion Logical sequencing of information throughout

Sufficient supporting details Clear and effective concluding message

Logical sequencing of information throughout Sufficient supporting details Clear and effective concluding message

Logical sequencing of information most of the time Details are given but

inadequate to support the topic

Clear concluding message but lacks effectiveness

Information presented with little organization

Most of the details are irrelevant

Concluding message not clear

Grammar (20 pts) No error Between one to two errors Between three to four errors More than four errors Oral Presentation (30

pts) Presented the topic well, and in an organized way

Complete and logical sequencing of information

Used English language

Presented the topic well but a little bit disorganized

Used English/Tagalog language

Not very well presented and a little bit disorganized

Majority used Tagalog language

Not well presented and disorganized

Majority used Tagalog language

References (10 pts) All resources cited One resource not cited Two resources not cited More than 3 resources not cited

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References:

Anderson, D. R. (2019).An introduction to management science: quantitative approaches to decision making(15thed.). Australia:

Cengage Learning.

Hillier, F. (2015).Introduction to operations research(10thed.). New York: McGraw-Hill Education

Render, B., Stair, T. et.al. (2015).Quantitative analysis for management(12thed.). Boston: Pearson Education Inc.

San Cristobal Mateo, J. R. (2015).Management science, operations research and project management: modelling, evaluation, scheduling, monitoring. England: Gower.

San Pedro, L. S.L. (2017).Operations research for business management. Manila: Unlimited Books Library Services & Publishing Sirug, W. (2015).Basic quantitative methods for business: an introduction to operations research/management science(revised).

Intramuros: Mindshapers Co.

Taha, H.A. (2017).Operations research: an introduction(10thed.) England: Pearson Education Limited Online References:

Books 24x7

AccessEngineering EBSCO

E-books:

Aliev, R. A., & Huseynov, O. H. (2014).Decision theory with imperfect information. Retrieved from eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.

Brandenburger, A. (2014).The language of game theory: Putting epistemics into the mathematics Of games. Retrieved from eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.

Chan, W. C. (2014).An elementary introduction to queueing systems. Retrieved from eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.

Dantzig, G.B. (2016).Linear programming and extensions.Retrieved from eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.

Narahari, Y. (2014).Game theory and mechanism design.Retrieved from eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.

Ougolnitsky, G., Petrosi︠ a︡ n, L. A., Mazalov, V. V., & Novikov, D. A. (2015).Game theory and applications (Vol. 17).Retrieved from eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.

Prisner, E. (2014). Game theory : Through examples. Retrieved from eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.

Truma, Y. (2014).Linear programming: Theory, algorithms and applications.Retrieved from eBook Collection (EBSCOhost) database.

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Expectations from Students

Students are held responsible for meeting the standards of performance established for each course. Their performance and compliance with other course requirements are the bases for passing or failing in each course, subject to the rules of the University. The students are expected to take all examinations on the date scheduled, read the assigned topics prior to class, submit and comply with all the requirements of the subject as scheduled, attend each class on time and participate actively in the discussions.

Furthermore, assignments such as reports, reaction papers and the like shall be submitted on the set deadline as scheduled by the faculty. Extension of submission is approved for students with valid reasons like death in the family, hospitalization and other unforeseen events. Hence, certificates are needed for official documentation. Students assigned by the University in extracurricular activities (Choral, Dance Troupe and Athletes) are excused from attending the class, however, said students are not excused from classroom activities that coincide the said University activities. Special quiz is given to students with valid reasons like death in the family, hospitalization and other unforeseen events. Hence, certificates are needed for official documentation. Likewise, special major examination is given to students with the same reasons above. Attendance shall be checked every meeting. Students shall be expected to be punctual in their classes. And observance of classroom decorum is hereby required as prescribed by student’s handbook.

Academic Integrity

It is the mission of the University to train its students in the highest levels of professionalism and integrity. In support of this, academic integrity is highly valued and violations are considered serious offenses. Examples of violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to, the following:

1.Plagiarism– using ideas, data or language of another without specific or proper acknowledgment. Example: Copying text from the Web site without quoting or properly citing the page URL, using crib sheet during examination. For a clear description of what constitutes plagiarism as well as strategies for avoiding it, students may refer to the HAU Student Handbook 2019-2020, Table of Offenses and Corresponding Sanctions B.7. For citation styles, students may refer to APA Style 6th Edition.

2.Cheating – using or attempting to use unauthorized assistance, materials, or study aids during examination or other academic work. Examples: using a cheat sheet in a quiz or exam, altering a grade exam and resubmitting it for a better grade. For the Policy in Cheating, students may refer to the HAU Student Handbook 2019-2020, Appendix I.

3.Fabrication– submitting contrived or improperly altered information in any academic requirements. Examples: making up data for a research project, changing data to bias its interpretation, citing nonexistent articles, contriving sources. Student may refer to HAU Student Handbook 2019-2020, Table of Offenses and Corresponding Sanctions B.7.

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Policy on Absences

1. Students should not incur absences of more than 20% of the required total number of class and laboratory periods in a given semester.

a. The maximum absences allowed per semester are:

For subjects held 1x a week, a maximum of 3 absences;

For subjects held 2x a week, a maximum of 7 absences; and For subjects held 3x a week, a maximum of 10 absences.

2. A student who incurs more than the allowed number of absences in any subject shall be given a mark of “FA” as his final rating for the semester, regardless of his performance in the class.

3. Attendance is counted from the first official day of regular classes regardless of the date of enrolment.

Other Policies

 Departmentalized when it comes to major exams such as Prelim, Midterms and Finals.

 Minimum of two (2) quizzes for every one (1) unit course will be given per semester.

 Drills, Exercises, Seat works, Projects, Recitation/Role playing will be given to the students and will be graded as part of class standing.

 Homework Policy will be given at the discretion of the faculty and will be graded as part of class standing.

Grading System (Campus ++):

Class Standing: 60%

 Seatworks

 Assignments

 Boardwork

 Quizzes

 Critiques

 Case Studies

 Final Output (Research) Major Exams: 40%

DatePrepared: Date

Effectivity: Prepared By: Reviewed By: Checked By: Certified By: Approved By:

May 2020 May 2020 Maria Elena Y.

Timbang, PIE Faculty

Engr. Ruselle Andrew P. Manalang

OBE Facilitator

Melani B. Cabrera, PIE Chairperson, Industrial

Engineering Program

Dr. Bonifacio V. Ramos Director,

University Library

Dr. Filipina I. De Guzman Dean, School of Engineering

and Architecture

Mga Sanggunian

NAUUGNAY NA DOKUMENTO

Grand Knight Ireneo Gacad, now District Deputy, was fiesta manager, while Financial Secretary Jesus Floirendo was the munici­ pal council chairman on the celebration.. The Bauang