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23

rd

Annual Philippine Biodiversity Symposium

organized by the Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines (WCSP) and the Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines (ASBP)

at the University of San Carlos (USC), Talamban, Cebu City 1-4 April 2014

Theme: Forging Partnerships for

Understanding and Conserving Philippine Biodiversity

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Associa ti o n o f System ati c Bi o logist s o f th e p h ili pp in es

Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines

Established in 1982, the Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines (ASBP) aims to promote and represent the science and practice of taxonomy, systematics and natu- ral history in the country. Initially formed by a core group of Filipino biologists and researchers based in the National Museum, its membership has grown to encompass pro- fessionals, students and enthusiasts all over the Philippines and abroad. Its scope has ex- panded in recent years outside of the traditional sphere of basic taxonomy and systematics to include ethnobiology, biodiversity conservation and public education. Membership in the ASBP is open to all who subscribe to the goals of the organization.

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The Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines (WCSP) is a professional organization of wildlife researchers, managers, scientists, and conservationists. The Society was formed to advance wildlife research and conservation in the Philippines through promoting collaborative research, providing technical assistance and training and increasing public awareness. Since 1992, wildlife biologists and conservationists from throughout the country have been meeting at the WCSP Annual Biodiversity Symposia and the proceedings from most of these annual meetings have been published. The WCSP was officially registered in 1993.

The WCSP Annual Philippine Biodiversity Symposia are generally held in April at different venues around the Philippines. Symposium activities include an institutional fair where organizations involved in biodiversity research and conservation can present posters, plenary and keynote addresses, concurrent workshops, and contributed oral and poster presentations including special sessions for high school and undergraduate students.

Symposia of the Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines 1992 Dumaguete, Negros Oriental

1993 Los Banos, Laguna 1994 Initao, Misamis Orientalv 1995 Quezon City, Metro Manila 1996 Dumaguete, Negros Oriental 1997 Los Banos, Laguna

1998 Davao City

1999 Puerto Princesa, Palawan 2000 Tagaytay, Cavite

2001 Dumaguete, Negros Oriental 2002 Cebu

2003 Murcia, Negros Occidental 2004 Antipolo, Rizal

2005 Tuguegarao, Cagayan Valley 2006 Puerto Princesa, PalawanW 2007 Davao City

2008 Baybay, Leyte 2009 Baguio, Benguet 2010 Naga, Camarines Sur

2011 Dumaguete, Negros Oriental 2012 Manila and Dasmariñas Cities 2013 Musuan, Bukidnon

2014 Talamban,Cebu City

Proceedings of the Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines Silliman Journal 1992, vol. 36, no. 1

Asia Life Sciences 1993, vol. 2, no. 2 Sylvatrop 1995, Vol. 5, nos. hh1 & 2 Sylvatrop 1997, Vol. 7, nos. 1 & 2 Sylvatrop 1998, Vol. 8, nos. 1 & 2 Sylvatrop 2000, Vol. 10, nos. 1 & 2 Silliman Journal 2001, vol. 42, no. 1 Sylvatrop 2003, Vol. 13, nos. 1 & 2 Agham Mindanaw 2004, vol. 2 Sylvatrop 2005, Vol. 15, nos. 1 & 2

Banwa Natural Science 2006, Vol. 3, nos. 1 & 2

Wi ld li fe C o ns er va ti o n Soci et y o f th e p h ili pp in es

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MESSAGE

I take this occasion to warmly greet and welcome everyone to the 23rd Philippine Biodi- versity Symposium held at the sprawling campus of the University of San Carlos in Cebu City. Our event promises to be the biggest gathering this year of academics, researchers, policymakers and stakeholders concerned with the extremely rich yet critically threatened flora and fauna of the Philippines. Nowhere is the cry of our threatened biodiversity loudest and most serious than on the island of Cebu which has reputedly lost almost all of its primary forests to the forces of modernization. The threats continue to this day because of the unabated degradation of critical life-supporting ecosystems both in the terrestrial and aquatic realms in the often misguided pursuit of economic development and urbanization. Sadly, the same scenario can be seen in many parts of the Philippines where elements of the rich and indigenous biodiversity cling to the edge of imminent extinction.

Our conference therefore rises to the occasion by rallying many concerned parties from all walks of life, from the portals of the academe, the active think tanks among policy- makers and NGOs and the workers on the ground to jointly explore and discuss viable solutions to the mounting challenges before us. We are bound by our common desire to know, understand, protect and conserve our rich biodiversity which forms an integral part of the Filipino natural heritage and which to a large part defines our Filipino na- tional identity. What biological heritage in its current sorry state that we have inherited from our forefathers, we must appreciate and nurture in a sustainable way to pass along someday to the next generations of Filipinos as part of an intangible legacy that only a well-informed and caring Filipino nation can do to its future citizens. Our generation will be held accountable by those who follow our path and will be judged by history for our actions. We hope that our conference will serve to remind us of this and other important consequences.

Allow me to commend the Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines and the Asso- ciation of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines for pooling their efforts and resources with great resolve to jointly organize this year’s Philippine Biodiversity Symposium. No- where is the conference theme on forging partnerships in understanding and conserving Philippine biodiversity ringing loud and true than in this unprecedented coming together of the Philippines’ two biggest biodiversity societies. We hope that this joint conference becomes a springboard of sustainable success that will bring us closer to our goals of knowing and protecting the natural heritage in our corner of the world.

LUISITO T. EVANGELISTA, Ph.D.

President

Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines

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MESSAGE

The theme of this Philippine Biodiversity Symposium, “Forging Partnerships for Bio- diversity Research and Conservation”, is for me the primary mission of the Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines. The Wildlife Conservation Society of the Phil- ippines (WCSP)andthe Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines (ASBP) have been forging partnerships through co-organizing this symposium. With the sub- stantial overlap in the objectives of both organizations we are very pleased for this op- portunity to work together.

The symposium is hosted by the University of San Carlos, the institutional home of a diverse team of biodiversity researchers. The island of Cebu, renown for its endemic species, is centrally locatedin the Philippines,and we have participants from all over the country. Furthermore, our symposium is graced by two highly respected international colleagues who have been working to further our understanding and the conservation of Philippine biodiversity, Dr. Peter Ng of the National University of Singapore and Dr.

Thomas Brooks of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. They, and our other international participants, demonstrate that our partnerships for biodiversity research and conservation are not limited to the country’s geographic boundaries – the conservation of Philippine biodiversity is a global priority.

Contributed papers, both oral and poster, comprise the bulk of the four-day symposium.

We salute the authors of the ____ submitted abstracts for oral and poster presentations.

They and their work are indications of the importance of forging partnerships for bio- diversity research and conservation – so we can better learn from and work with fellow biodiversity researchers and conservationists. The task of screening the abstracts was challenging, especially as even with concurrent sessions hard decisions had to be made.

To ensure fairness and consistency in the decisions on which abstracts to accept for oral presentations, each abstract was reviewed by at least two reviewers with familiarity with the topic concerned; final decisions were made by the Abstract Review Committee, with members from both ASBP and WCSP.

This year marks the birth of the Biodiversity Conservation Society of the Philippines.

The Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines was born at the first Philippine Biodiversity Symposium in 1992 and officially registered in 1993. Almost all of the founding members (I am proud to have been one of them!) were terrestrial vertebrate biologists, and “Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines” was a natural choice.

Since then, the members of the WCSP have broadened their interests to all terrestrial biodiversity (including freshwater), and marine mammals and marine turtles. (Other organizations are already doing a very good job of covering our rich Philippine marine biodiversity.)

The WCSP board felt that “biodiversity” more accurately represents the collective focus of our work and passion. The term was coined in 1985 as a contraction of “biological diversity” and has become widely used worldwide and in the Philippines. “’Biological diversity’ means the variability among living organisms from all sources including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part; this includes diversity within species, between species and of eco- systems” (Article 2 of the Convention on Biological Diversity).The Biodiversity Con- servation Society of the Philippines is technically a new organization, but it contains over two decades ofcollective experience of the Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines working for Philippine biodiversity conservation.

NINA R. INGLE, PhD President

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Table of Contents

Note: Abstracts are alphabetically arranged by first author

Symposium Schedule 7

Poster Titles – Student 15

Poster Titles – Regular 17

Keynote Address: Dr. Peter K.L. Ng 20 Keynote Address: Dr. Thomas Brooks 21 Oral Presentations – High School 22 Oral Presentations – Undergraduate 24 Oral Presentations - Regular 29

Posters – High School 49

Posters - Undergraduate 50

Posters – Regular 59

Workshops 76

Acknowledgements 78

Organizers 79

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Pr ogr a m

23rd Annual Philippine Biodiversity Symposium

organized by the Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines (WCSP) and the Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines (ASBP)

at the University of San Carlos (USC), Talamban, Cebu City 1-4 April 2014

Theme: Forging Partnerships for

Understanding and Conserving Philippine Biodiversity 1 April 2014

Tuesday 9:00 am–1:30 pm

CAFA Lobby Symposium Registration

Set-up of poster presentations, submission of PowerPoint presentations, sign-up for workshops

11:00-12:00 noon Learning Resource Center, Main Library

Exhibit Opening: Biodiversity in the Visayas

1:30–3:00 pm CAFA Main Theater

Opening Program Emcee: Dr. Roberto C. Pagulayan Invocation

National Anthem

Welcome to the Philippine Biodiversity Symposium, Dr. Luisito T.

Evangelista, President, Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines Recognition of Represented Organizations: Dr. Nina R. Ingle, President, Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines

Welcome to the University of San Carlos

Inspirational Message: Dr. Isabelo R. Montejo, Regional Executive Director, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Region VII Inspirational Message: Dr. Theresa Mundita Lim, Director, Biodiversity Management Bureau

3:00–3:30 Coffee Break

3:30-4:00 Biodiversity Research at the University of San Carlos: Dr. Filipina B.

Sotto, Head, USC Marine Station, Department of Biology, University of San Carlos

4:00–4:30 Getting to Know Fellow Systematists and Biodiversity Researchers and Conservationists – Dr. Edwin R. Tadiosa and Mr. Apolinario B.

Cariño 4:30–6:00

CAFA Lobby

Opening of Institutional Posters 5:30–6:00

Secretariat Office

Briefing for All Presenters and Moderators – Dr. Rey Donne S. Papa and Mr. Carlo Custodio

6:00–8:00 CAFA Lobby

Welcome Dinner 2 April 2014

Wednesday 8:00–8:40 outside CAFA Main

Theater

Registration

CAFA Main Theater Emcee: Dr. Arvin C. Diesmos

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8:50-9:00 The Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines, Dr.

Luisito T. Evangelista

9:00–9:40 Keynote Address: Southeast Asia Biodiversity Research: Redux?, Dr.

Peter K. L. Ng, Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research,National University of Singapore

9:40–10:00 Open Forum 10:00-10:30 Snack Break

Concurrent Scientific Paper Presentations CAFA Main Theater

Session 1: Student Presentations Moderator: Dr. Lawrence M. Liao

CAFA Mini-Theater Session 2

Moderator: Dr. Melanie Medecilo 10:30-10:45 Contiguous forest cover or

broken woodland: testing models of residential development vis-a-vis bird diversity in Antipolo, Taytay, Rizal

Aira Trisha G. Dy Guaso, Timothy Stephen D. Blas, Paula Erika B. Capanas, Angelo Miguel R.

Gemzon, Kevin Clinton D.C.

Sorilla and Yo Han Sung

Evidence for a novel natural Begonia hybrid from Panay Island, the Philippines Rosario R. Rubite, Jelene V. Macabasco, Arlene D.

Talaña, Grecebio Jonathan D.

Alejandro, Ching-I Peng, Koh Nakamuraand Yoshiko Kono

10:45-11:00 Re-introduction of Awaous melanocephalus Bleeker, 1849 (Biang Bato) in three Antipolo streams experiencing graded anthropogenic disturbance Marina Nicole G. Salvador, Paulina Danice A. Cedro, Ana Rafaella U.

Aligaen, Vincent Paul W. Valera Jr., Nikko Maurice C. Nackaerts, Edward Vincent C. De Leon and Young Jun Eom

Amorphophallus

adamsensis, an addition to the Philippine flora

Liezel M. Magtoto, Deemson G. Mones, Karen A. Ballada, Celia M. Austria, Romeo M.

Dizon, Wilfredo V. Alangui, Aris A. Reginaldo, Wilen M.

Galvan, Kathleen T. Dizon and Wilbert L.A. Hetterscheid 11:00-11:15 Species limits and biogeography

of Philippine Malkohas

(Cuculiformes:Cuculidae) from Luzon Islands and Palawan Faunal Regions

Estephen B. Fortela and Juan Carlos T. Gonzalez

Inventory, assessment and conservation of selected threatened, endemic, rare and economic species of seed plants in Mindanao Victor B. Amoroso, Hannah P.

Lumista, Reggie Y. Dela Cruz and Florfe M. Acma

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11:15-11:30 Habitat use and foraging behavior of Golden Yellow White-eye (Zosterops nigrorum catarmanensis) in Camiguin Island, Northern Mindanao Kimberly Ma. R. Mendoza, Dennis A. Warguez, Lisa Marie J.

Paguntalan and Philip Godfrey C.

Jakosalem

Exploring ex situ conservation of

Aglaomorpha cornucopia (Copel.) M.C. Roos: A rare and endemic fern from the Philippines

Yao-Moan Huang, Victor B.

Amoroso, Kathleen Grace S.

Paraguas, Fulgent Coritico and Wen-Liang Chiou 11:30-11:45 Diversity and diurnal roosting

preferences of cave-dwelling bats in Barangay Plazan and Lower Itil, Balabagan, Lanao del Sur, Philippines

Johaimen M. Maca-alang, Bradley Bob V. Dela Calzada, Dennis A. Warguez and Daisy Lou L.

Polestico

Diversity and characterization of

epiphytic macrolichens of Caliking, Atok, Benguet Mechell P. Lardizaval, Leo Carlexter Sison, Froi Perez, Kjeldsen Mae Dumlao, Yolanda Falingao, Marianthe Saquing and Paulina A.

Bawingan 11:45-12:00 Microhabitat of the Philippine

Tarsier, Tarsius syrichta (Linn. 1758) in a semi-captive environment in Corella, Bohol, Philippines

Quennie Ann Uy, Therese Elaine B.

Enad, Noel D. Roble, and Julie B.

Otadoy

Vascular plants of the peat swamp forest in Caimpugan, Agusan del Sur Province on Mindanao Island, Philippines

Lowell G. Aribal, and Edwino S. Fernando

12:00–1:30 pm Lunch

Concurrent Scientific Paper Presentations CAFA Main Theater

Session 3: Student Presentations Moderator: Dr. Lawrence M. Liao

CAFA Mini-Theater Session 4

Moderator: Mr. John Rey Callado 1:30-1:45 Diversity, distribution,

and habitat association of amphibian fauna of

Bunawan, Agusan del Sur with implications for conservation of forest-associated threatened and endemic taxa

Jaymar M. Falcasantos and Adam Roy V.Galolo

A survey of plants used as repellents against hematophagous insects by the Ayta people of Pampanga province, Philippines

Jasper John A. Obico and Elena M. Ragragio

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1:45-2:00 Comparison of the diversity of ground-dwelling ants in a forested area and a coconut plantation in Bacon-Manito, Bicol, Philippines

Felipe L. Del Castillo, Ma. Dolores C. Tongco and David M. General

Soil-vegetation

interrelationships of tree species in a lowland forest in the Puerto Princesa Subterranean River national park

Ralph Sedricke Lapuz, Rodel Barairo, Jr. and Marcelle Louise Aquino

2:00-2:15 Spider diversity in the Owl’s Nest area in the University of the Philippines, Diliman

Kevin John A. Verona, Ma. Dolores C. Tongco, and Aimee Lyn Barrion-Dupo

Fungal flora of Batanes Group of Islands: a lesser known group of organism in the Philippines

Edwin R. Tadiosa, Maya M. Beronque, Kathrine K.

Balderas, Susan S. Cataluna and Roger Hubayan

2:15-2:30 Macrophyte distribution in the littoral zones of Lake Taal Anna Patricia V. Gerong, Patricia D. Orellana, Chrio A. Sta. Ana, George Louis P. Caballes, Kenoses L. Legaspi, Jonathan Carlo A. Briones and Rey Donne S. Papa

Diversity and biomass potential of microalgae in estuary and fresh water ecosystems

Lothy Fernandez-Casim, Bryan Lloyd P. Bretaňa and Alexter F. Generale

2:30-2:45 The effects of

anthropogenic land use on the distribution of butterflies in Negros Oriental, Philippines Jade Aster T. Badon 2:45–4:00 Opening of Scientific Posters

Pecha Kucha - brief presentations for high school and undergraduate poster presenters

Moderators: Ms. Lisa Paguntalan and Dr. Pauline A. Bawingan 4:00–6:00

CAFA Lobby

Viewing of Scientific Posters (refreshments available) 3 April 2014

Thursday

CAFA Main Theater Emcee: Dr. Neil Adrin D. Mallari 8:40–8:50 am Raffle and Announcements

8:50-9:00 The Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines and the Biodiversity Conservation Society of the Philippines, Dr. Nina R. Ingle 9:00–9:40 Keynote Address: Guiding Decisions with Biodiversity Knowledge,

Dr. Thomas Brooks, Science and Knowledge Unit, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

9:40–10:00 Open Forum 10:00-10:45

Front of CAFA Building

Snack Break

Group Picture Taking

10:45-12:00 Annual General Meeting (Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines)

Poster Viewing (for non-ASBP members)

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12:30-1:30 pm Lunch

Concurrent Scientific Paper Presentations CAFA Main Theater

Session 5

Moderator: Ms. Myrissa Lepiten-Tabao

CAFA Mini-Theater Session 6

Moderator: Ms. Renee Lorica 1:30-1:45 Small is beautiful: conservation

partnership for rural

development with Indigenous peoples in Mindanao

Jayson Ibanez

The Isabela Oriole conservation: saving our golden treasure

Joni T. Acay, Nikki Dyanne C. Realubit, Myrna C. Cureg, Antonia M. Bagunu and Merlijn van Weerd 1:45-2:00 Using local attitudes and

social values for selecting Key Conservation Areas in Mount Hamiguitan Range

Rai Kristie Salve Gomez, Jayson Ibañez, Tatiana Rose Abaño,Anna Leah Pilayre, Shari Campano and Dennis Salvador

From subspecies to species, applying the Tobias criteria on Philippine birds

Juan Carlos T. Gonzalez

2:00-2:15 The biodiversity partnerships project: mainstreaming

biodiversity conservation through national agencies, conservation groups and local government units’ collaboration initiatives

Jose M. Regunay, Ben-Hur R.

Viloria and Theresa Mundita S.

Lim

Survey of Philippine Eagles and their nests in the

Northern Cordillera Range in Apayao Province

Tatiana Rose C. Abaño and Jayson C. Ibañez

2:15-2:30 Enhancing the adaptive capacity of the indigenous peoples by promoting sustainable and community-based resin tapping of Almaciga (Agathis philippinensis Warb.) in

selected certificate of ancestral domain title (CADT) areas in Palawan and Sierra Madre Florena B. Samiano and Arsenio B.

Ella

Conservation status of Philippine Eagles in Leyte:

what we currently know Giovanne Tampos, Jayson Ibanez, Dennis Salvador and Kathleen Aballe

2:30-2:45 Notable threatened trees and its potential as seed source for restoring the lowland rainforest of Central Panay Mountain Range

Ruth C. Martinez

The diversity and

conservation of birds and bats of Calanasan, Apayao, northern Cordillera, Luzon, Philippines

Merlijn van Weerd, Dominic Rodriguez, Marites Balbas,

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2:45-3:00 Lessons learned in the implementation of forest restoration efforts in the Philippines: The Haribon Foundation experience

Thaddeus Martinez and Miel Loria

Three new species of Musseromys: why does it matter?

Lawrence R. Heaney, Danilo S.

Balete, Eric A. Rickart, Maria Josefa Veluz, and Sharon A.

Jansa 3:00–3:30 Snack Break

3:30-6:00 Annual General Meeting (Biodiversity Conservation Society of the Philippines)

Poster Viewing (for non-WCSP/BSCP members) 6:00-8:00 Fellowship Banquet

Awarding for Student Presentations

Announcement of Winners of the Silent Auction 4 April 2014

Friday

8:25-8:30 am Raffle and Announcements

Concurrent Scientific Paper Presentations CAFA Main Theater

Session 7

Moderator: Dr. Leticia Afuang

CAFA Mini-Theater Session 8 Moderator: Dr. Tammy

Mildenstein 9:00-9:15 Crocodiles enhance local fishery

productivity: two examples from the Philippines

Abner A. Bucol, Rainier I. Manalo, Angel C. Alcala, Paulina S. Aspilla, Vicente P. Mercado, William T.

Belo and Salvador S. Chan

Cave bats of Pisan, Kabacan, Cotabato, Philippines with notes on the local threats and disturbance and its implication to conservation Krizler C. Tanalgo, Marion John Michael M. Achondo and John Aries G. Tabora

9:15-9:30 Conservation genetics and trade forensics of Philippine sailfin lizards

Cameron D. Siler, Rafe M. Brown and Andres Lira

Bat flies (Diptera:

Nycteribiidae) from selected localities: extending the bat fly distribution in the Philippines

James DV. Alvarez, Ireneo L.

Lit, Jr., and Phillip A. Alviola 9:30-9:45 Detection and occupancy of

anurans from forest fragments in Cavite, Luzon Island,

Philippines

Rubie M. Causaren, Arvin C.

Diesmos and Neil Aldrin D.

Mallari

Filipinos for flying foxes:

engaging local stakeholders in flying fox conservation in northeast Luzon

Marites Balbas, Edmund Jose, Tammy Mildenstein and Merlijn van Weerd

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9:45-10:00 Revised conservation status assessment for Philippine amphibians

Rafe Brown, Cameron Siler, Arvin Diesmos, Marites B. Sanguilaand Angel Alcala

One animal’s trash is another animal’s treasure:

fecal samples as the non- invasive key to fruit bat conservation genetics Tammy L. Mildenstein, Veronica A. Brown, Laura Jenkins, Gary F. McCracken and L. Scott Mills

10:00–10:30 Snack Break

Concurrent Scientific Paper Presentations CAFA Main Theater

Session 9 Moderator: Dr. Rafe Brown

CAFA Mini-Theater Session 10

Moderator: Dr. Jonathan Rubio 10:30–10:45 Populations of the critically

endangered Palawan Forest Turtle Siebenrockiella leytensis continue decreasing – results of long term studies

Sabine Schoppe and Diverlie Acosta

Biodiversity in aquaculture ponds and cages and the adjoining mangroves and seagrass beds

Teodora Bagarinao 10:45–11:00 Ecological studies to promote

conservation of the endemic Palawan Forest Turtle

Siebenrockiella leytensis in Palawan Philippines

Diverlie Acosta, Edgar Jose, Lyca Sandrea Castro, Ronelito Esuma, and Miguelito Cervancia

Malacological survey along the intertidal zone of Las Piñas-Parañaque critical habitat and ecotourism area (LPPCHEA)

Melody Anne B. Ocampo, Geneva Carla S. Chavez and Carla Clarise A. Aguila 11:00–11:15 Conservation of the Palawan

Forest Turtle Siebenrockiella leytensis– a holistic approach Sabine Schoppe

Species richness and distribution of Cladocera (Branchiopoda: Anomopoda and Ctenopoda) in

Philippine Inland Waters Jhaydee Ann F. Pascual, Eric Zeus C. Rizo, Henri J.

Dumont, Boping Han and Rey Donne S. Papa

11:15–11:30 The sea turtles captured by coastal fisheries around Panay and Guimaras: documentation, care, tagging, and release Teodora Bagarinao

Reproductive biology of Christian crabs (Charybdis feriatus, Linnaeus, 1758) in San Miguel Bay

Plutomeo M. Nieves, Nelson R. Olfindo and Aldrin Mel B.

Macale 11:30-11:45 Deep sea chitons

(Polyplacophora) on sunken wood

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Pr ogr a m

1:00-4:00 pm Afternoon Symposium and Workshops (to be held concurrently at different venues)

Moderator: Mr. Carlo Custodio

AF-101 Challenges and Issues Facing Natural History Collections and Museums

Facilitators: Lawrence M. Liao, Hiroshima University and Luisito T.

Evangelista, National Museum of the Philippines

AF-102 Reinventing the Wheel of Environmental Education

Facilitators: Henry G. Calilung, Marina Nicole G. Salvador, Aira Trisha G.

Dy Guaso and Ria Rochelle M. Garcia, Holistic Education and Development Center

AF-103 Would the Proposed New Standards for Identification of Key Biodiversity Areas Be Fit For Purpose in the Philippines?

Facilitators: Thomas Brooks, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Shiela Vergara, ASEAN Center for Biodiversity and Nina R. Ingle, Wildlife Conservation Society of the Philippines

AF-104 Local Communities as Partners in Biodiversity Research and Conservation

Myrissa Lepiten-Tabao, Visayas Regional Unit, Foundation for the Philippines Environment and Tanya Conlu, Non-Timber Forest Products – Exchange Programme

4:00–5:00 CAFA Main Theater

Closing Program Emcee: Mr. Carlo Custodio

Message from Incoming President of the Association of Systematic Biologists of the Philippines

Message from Incoming President of the Biodiversity Conservation Society of the Philippines

Awarding of Certificates of Appreciation and Participation Closing Message from the University of San Carlos 5 April 2014

Saturday 7 am

Portal (Main Gate) USC Talamban

Campus

Assembly for Olango Island Field Trip

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Poster

t I T L E S

HIGH SCHOOL POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Identification of endoparasites and ectoparasites present in the PSHS-MC squirrel Ron Rainier A. Esponilla

UNDERGRADUATE POSTER PRESENTATIONS

A Comparative Study on the Ecomorphology of the Philippine Flying Dragon on Different Islands and Between Forest and Non-Forest Habitats

Jessica D. Alcoreza, Anna S. De Castro, Levy Necesito, Bonifacio C. Pedregosa, Sunshine Reinboldand Mae Lowe L. Diesmos

Population Density and Microhabitat Preferences of Camiguin Narrow-Mouthed Frog (Oreophryne nana) in Mount Timpoong, Camiguin Sur, Philippines

Christie Marie J. Alorro, Mel Daniel C. Dangel, Dennis A. Warguez, and Philip Godfrey C. Jakosalem

Assemblages, Visitation Rates and Behavior of Birds in Selected Fruiting Trees in Mt.

Timpoong, Camiguin Sur, Philippines

Arjay E. Amba, Dennis A. Warguez, Lisa Marie J. Paguntalan, Philip Godfrey C. Jakosalem Karyotype of a Minute Frog Species Oreophryne sp. (Amphibia:Anura:Microhylidae) in Agusan Marsh, Bunawan, Agusan del Sur, Philippines, and Notes on its Morphobehavioral Characteristics

Raul B. Balinton Jr. and Cesar A. de la Seña

Diversity, Abundance and Roosting Preferences of Bats in the Caves of Barangay Lower Itil, Balabagan, Lanao del Sur, Philippines

Gerald May Borres, Bradley Bob V. Dela Calzada and Dennis A. Warguez

Above Ground Carbon Stock Assessment of Selected Pine Stands in Baguio City Aubrey Kate Cadangen and Celia Austria

Habitat Preferences of Ground–Dwelling Small Mammals of Mt. Timpoong, Camiguin Sur, Philippines

Aren Beryl B. Daga, Chloe Tan Yi Ting, Dennis A. Warguez, and Philip Godfrey C. Jakosalem Diversity, Distribution and Habitat Selection of Kingfishers in Camiguin Sur,

Philippines

Janissa A. Fabricante, Dennis A. Warguez, Lisa Marie J. Paguntalan and Philip Godfrey C.

Jakosalem

Diversity and Abundance of Stream Frogs in Camiguin Sur, Northern Mindanao Gerrie Mae A. Flores, Dennis A. Warguez and Philip Godfrey C. Jakosalem

Ecological Importance of Formicidae Species within a Protected Area Rena Jean Gonzales, Jenalie Saturinas and Geonyzl L. Alviola

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Poster

t I T L E S

Diversity of Myxobacteria in Las Piñas – Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area, Metro Manila, Philippines: A Pilot Study

Jason Patrick Z. Jalandoni, Wilhelm M. Javier, Sherwin R. Escurel, Anne Michelle N. Ramirez, Raphael Denisson Orinday, Francez Dennisse J. Peralta, Jerome S. Mercado, Kamille D.

Nepomuceno, John Mervin T. Nadala, Rey Mauricio T. Aguinaldo, Renz Marion B. Gamido, Ramon P. Luber, and Ace Bryan S. Cabal

Preliminary report on the amphibians and reptiles of Taguibo Watershed, Butuan City, Agusan del Norte, Philippines

Marjorie Y. Mahinay, Roger R. Edma, Jeszianlenn L. Plaza, Mary Grace T. Medrano and Marites B. Sanguila

Diversity of Streptomycetes in Las Piñas – Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area, Metro Manila, Philippines: A Pilot Study

Raymond H. Parcon, Ren Mark D. Villanueva, Sherwin R. Escurel, Anne Michelle N. Ramirez, Raphael Denisson, Maria Cecilia E. Landicho, Jheann D. Dapula, Angelle Joy M. Quiambao, Eleanore C. Maranan, Rey Mauricio T. Aguinaldo, Renz Marion B. Gamido, Ramon P. Luber, and Ace Bryan S. Cabal

Corticolous lichens (with new records) of the Hundred Islands, Alaminos, Pangasinan

Ashley Pinas, Roselyn Amancio, Mae Ann Caliway, Dave Amilao and Roel Beniking, Kevin Neil Lagrateja and Paulina Bawingan

Species Accounts of Anurans within the Protected Area

Jan Lemuel Sedayao, Patrisha Carilhay, Denise Ballocanag and Geonyzl L. Alviola Habitat Preferences of Loriculus philippensis camiguinensis in Mt. Timpoong, Camiguin Sur, Northern Mindanao

Rollenne May O. Tago, Dennis A. Warguez and Philip Godfrey C. Jakosalem

Distribution, Abundance and Microhabitat Preferences of Swiftlets in Selected Caves of Northwestern Mindanao, Philippines

Mark Louie M. Tangalin, Chervil L. Ferenal, Dennis A. Warguez and Daisy Lou L. Polestico In vitro culture of Strongylodon macrobotrys A. Gray (Fabaceae) using Low-cost Gelling Agents and Organic Additives

Frances Mae Tenorio, Silver Marie Brodit and Ma. Eleanor Calapatia-Salvador

Diversity, Distribution and Microhabitat Preferences of Frogs in Mt. Timpoong, Camiguin Sur, Philippines

Eloisa Mae A. Tereso, Dennis A. Warguez, Philip Godfrey C. Jakosalem Mixed-Species Bird Flocks in a Tropical Montane Forest,

Mt. Timpoong, Camiguin Sur, Philippines

Jean S. Tolentino, Dennis A. Warguez, and Philip Godfrey C. Jakosalem

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Poster

t I T L E S

REGULAR POSTER PRESENTATIONS

Diversity of freshwater gastropods in Lakes Taal, Sampaloc and Laguna de Bay Ann-Geneve A. Adorable, Roberto C. Pagulayan and Rey Donne S. Papa

Critical habitat establishment for Rafflesia speciosa in Barbaza, Antique Alexander A. Alabado

Characterization of flying fox roost in Malones, Dalaguete, Cebu, central Philippines Hemres M. Alburo

Update on avian species accounts of Malagos Watershed Geonyzl L. Alviola

Species distribution mapping of five threatened species in Panay Island Gregaldy C. Azares

Waste of biodiversity in the fine-mesh fixed filter net (tangab) fishery in Iloilo Strait Teodora Bagarinao

Stele and stomatal features of some Sellaginella : it’s significance in systematics Majella G. Bautista and Victor B. Amoroso

Diet composition and prevalence of selected feline pathogens of Palawan leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis heaneyi Groves, 1997) in Barangay Cabigaan, Municipality of Aborlan, Palawan Island, Philippines

Carah Lyn G. Calawagan, Anna Pauline O. de Guia, Anna Pauline O. de Guia, and Maria Catalina T. de Luna

Biodiversity of the phytoplankton community of Lake Mohicap (San Pablo City, Laguna, Philippines)

Cecilia S. Cordero and Susana F. Baldia

Featuring educational puppetry in wildlife conservation communication campaigns for school children in Northern Philippines: The ISU – NGO Crusade

Myrna C. Cureg, Marites G. Balbas, Antonia M. Bagunu, Joni T. Acay, Jan van der Ploeg And Merlijn van Weerd

Identification of ecto- and endoparasites in Glossogobius giuris (Hamilton, 1822) from Laguna de Bay

Rodante G. Flores and Feliz Reyda V. Revilla

Vegetation analysis of the island towns of Laoang and San Antonio, Northern Samar, Philippines

Divina M. Galenzoga

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Poster

t I T L E S

Annotated list of odonata from Mainit Hot Spring Protected Landscape, Compostela Valley, Mindanao Island, Philippines

Kim Macapagal Jumawan, Milton Norman Medina and Reagan Joseph Torayno Villanueva Natural Beach Forest Species Inventory and Mapping in Barangay Poblacion, Lingayen, Pangasinan

C. G. B. Lagunzad, J. A. B.Almazar, E.G. Amurao, E.A C. Malong, I. G. G. Quiambao, R.C.

Quilla

Species richness of Lauraceae in Mt. Musuan and Mt. Kitanglad Mercedita A. Laurie and Victor B. Amoroso

Mangrove forests of Davao City and Island Garden City of Samal Jessele Madanguit-Casiño, J-ney B. Zapanta and Geonyzyl L. Alviola

Genetic diversity of wild Abaca (Musa textilis Nee) species from the Germplasm collection of the National Abaca Research Center, Visca, Baybay City, Leyte Luz O. Moreno and Cherryl O. Quiñones

Assessment of macro-invertebrate gleaning in Lagonoy Gulf: Albay Side Plutomeo M. Nieves, Skorzeny C. de Jesus, Aldrin Mel B. Macale and Jasper R. Nieves Biodiversity of mangroves in selected coastal areas of Cavite

Art Santocildes Palacios Jr. and Josefina R. Rint

Results of avifaunal survey in Real-Infanta Watershed Forest Reserve towards a critical habitat status

J Kahlil Panopio and Kevin Carlo Artiaga

Diversity and patterns of occurrence of Bats in Adams, Ilocos Norte, Philippines Aris A. Reginaldo and Karen D. Ortua

Taxonomic studies on four Cladoceran families in Philippine inland waters with an updated key to Philippine Cladocera

Eric Zeus C. Rizo, Jhaydee-Ann F. Pascual, Henri Dumont, Boping Han and Rey Donne S. Papa A gap analysis of wildfowl demographic research: meeting conservation priorities?

Beth Roberts, Ed Harris, M Geoff Hilton, Carmela Española and Stuart Marsden Initial findings on Northern Sierra Madre forest monitor Lizard Varanusbitatawa distribution and ecology

Dominic Rodriguez, Stephanie Jane Law, Joost Besijn, Arnold Macadangdang, Edmund Jose, Selvino de Kort, Daniel Bennett3 and Merlijn van Weerd

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Poster

t I T L E S

Comparative morphological and anatomical studies of three Hoya species from Mount Hamiguitan, Davao Oriental

Daryl S. Salas, Evangeline B. Sinamban and Dave P. Buenavista

Ectoparasitic infestation of quarantined animals in a Wildlife Rescue Center Glenn L. Sia Su, Christian James A. Amil, Jilly Ann P. San Juan, Maria Lilibeth L. Sia Su, Glenn S. Maguad, Rizza A.F. Salinas, Elena M. Ragragio, Anna Theresa A. Santiago and Gliceria B. Ramos

Bat species in Kinayao Mining Area, Sultan Kudarat, Philippines Krizler C. Tanalgo, Lothy F. Casim and John Aries G. Tanalgo

Bat Cave Prioritization Index (BCPI): a scheme in prioritizing bat cave for conservation in the Philippines

Krizler C. Tanalgo and John Aries G. Tabora

Rapid assessment of bird and bat species in riparian habitats along the Pinacanauan de Tuguegarao, Penablanca Cagayan

Samuel P. Telan, Dante M. Aquino, Jouel B. Taggueg, Lito S. Guzman Jr.

Documenting fish species in selected major Philippine lakes

Armi G. Torres, Emily C. Capuli, Arlene G. Sampang, Nicolas Bailly and Christine Marie V.

Casal

Gastrointestinal Helminth fauna of bats in Puting Bato, Polillo Gil Gabriel S. Villancio, Vachel Gay V. Paller and Philip A. Alviola

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Ke yn o te Ad d ress

Southeast Asia Biodiversity Research: Redux?

Peter K. L. Ng*

National University of Singapore

A land area of 4.5 million square kilometres with 600 million people and a GDP of over US$2 trillion dollars …. A region with varguably the greatest range of natural habitats on Earth - extensive coral reefs, mangrove swamps, estuaries, shallow seas, deep-sea systems, rivers, peat and freshwater swamps, lowland and highland rainforests and caves that spans tropical and subtropical zones. An area with perhaps the richest diversity of plant and animal life on the planet …Southeast Asia is unique in its mosaic of habitats and lifeforms. But it is a region that is facing immense changes and challenges even as it grows in economic might.

And it is not just the oft-heard threat of environmental degradation and species loss. Grave though this threat is, I have a greater fear. Whether the citizens of the region really want it in the first place. It centres on a core question– whetherregional scientists want toconduct high-quality regional researchon its fauna and flora, and be academically independent in the long term.

How can regional biologists collaborate more on the increasingly “international” platform of science so that they have a larger voice – not just to their constituent nationals, but also for their regional friends and international comrades-in-science? Is niche-research in biodiversity the right thing even as most ASEAN universities and instituties benchmark themselves against their Ivy League counterparts in the west and chase impact factors and publishing “cutting edge” science? Biodiversity concerns in the 1990s have slowly evolved to the environmental and climate change worries of the new millenium. Despite this, there are few regional researchers providing the much needed baseline biodiversity for these activities, and of these, many remain provincial and few are major players in their domain.

For example, the great majority of top taxonomists of Southeast Asian plants and animals still reside in the West. How can the region become more independent and become a prime mover rather than just a follower?

This wide-ranging talk will look at examples of what has been successful regionally, what its workers can do to reinforce and catalyse research cum collaborations among its scientists, and better integrate with the more mature programs of the West, as well as examine this

“fuzzy” concept called “basic science”.

*PETER K.L. NG is Professor at the Department of Biological Sciences and Director of the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, both at the National University of Singapore. He specializes on the diversity and biology of marine and freshwater crabs of the Indo-Pacific and studies the diversity of Southeast Asian freshwater fishes on the side. Throughout his more than two decades of work, he has published more than 500 technical books and papers on these subjects including several in such journals as Nature and Science. He believes that taxonomy is the basis of all modern biodiversity work, whether ecology, conservation or even management. He sits on the external academic review boards of major organizations like the Smithsonian Institution and the International Commission of Zoological Nomenclature, conservation agencies like the World Conservation Union, global and regional biodiversity bodies like the UN Environmental Programme (UNEP) and on numerous editorial boards of peer-reviewed journals around the world. Lately, the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research under his leadership co-organized one of the biggest biodiversity expeditions to explore deep-water fauna in the Bohol Sea in tandem with some Philippine institutions and the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and involving more than 80 scientists from 25 different countries. His track record exemplifies extensive partnerships and collaboration in biodiversity research spanning the different continents.

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Ke yn o te Ad d ress

Guiding Decisions with Biodiversity Knowledge

Thomas Brooks*

Head, Science and Knowledge Unit, International Union of the Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

The establishment in 2012 of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) has highlighted the importance of biodiversity knowledge in guiding societal decisions. The platform has been mandated to build from existing mechanisms in delivering four functions to allow such biodiversity-informed decision-making: assessment, knowledge generation, capacity building, and policy support. Fortunately, there is much to build from at both the international level (e.g., IUCN) and the Philippine national level (e.g., WCSP and ASBP). I discuss four biodiversity-related assessments, implemented at national level following global standards. The Red List of Threatened Species assesses the risk of species extinction. Globally, 71,576 species have been assessed, with 22,146 threatened. For the Philippines, where Red Listing has been convened by WCSP, 3,798 species have been assessed, with 737 threatened. A sister Red List protocol for assessing risk of ecosystem collapse is currently under development. These Red Lists in turn trigger the identification of sites contributing significantly to biodiversity persistence, for various approaches have been developed (e.g., Important Bird Areas). A global standard for identification of such sites is currently being consolidated as an umbrella for these approaches, and has already been implemented in the Philippines, identifying 1v01 terrestrial, 77 marine, and 50 coastal Key Biodiversity Areas. Many Key Biodiversity Areas are existing protected areas (e.g., 91 in the Philippines), documented through a fourth knowledge product, Protected Planet, by synthesis of national compilations of data into the World Database on Protected Areas (e.g., 49,453 km2 of protected areas in the Philippines, covering 11% of the land area and 2% of the sea). All of these assessments document knowledge gaps and hence help prioritization of field research; all are also enabled by capacity building efforts. We can consider demand for this biodiversity knowledge from across four decision contexts: intergovernmental policy (e.g., reporting progress towards the Convention on Biological Diversity’s Aichi Targets);

conservation action (e.g., monitoring protected area effectiveness); development safeguards (e.g., adhering to the International Finance Corporation’s Performance Standard 6); and land- and seascape planning (e.g., informing stabilization of indigenous land tenure). Such knowledge generation, capacity building, and support to policy and practice are likely to be at least as important as assessment, and require investment accordingly.

*Thomas Brooks heads science and knowledge at the International Union for Conservation of Nature, where his responsibilities include scientific support to the delivery of knowledge products, maintaining interaction with peer scientific institutions, and strengthening the Union’s culture of science.

Originally from Brighton, UK, he holds a BA (Hons) in Geography from the University of Cambridge (1993) and a PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Tennessee (1998). He has previously worked for The Nature Conservancy (1998–1999), Conservation International (1999–

2010), and NatureServe (2010–2012). His background is in threatened species conservation (especially of birds) and in biodiversity hotspots (he has extensive field experience in tropical forests of Asia, South America, and Africa).

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O ral P res ent ati o ns Hi gh Sch oo l

Contiguous forest cover or broken woodland: testing models of residential development vis-a-vis bird diversity in Antipolo, Taytay, Rizal

Aira Trisha G. Dy Guaso, Timothy Stephen D. Blas, Paula Erika B. Capanas, Angelo Miguel R. Gemzon, Kevin Clinton D.C. Sorilla and Yo Han Sung

Holistic Education and Development Center, 95 Beverly Hills, Taytay, Rizzal Email: airadyguaso@gmail.com, blas_tim@yahoo.com, pipaycaps@gmail.com,

migsgmzn@yahoo.com, kcsorilla@yahoo.com, happyi429@nate.com

With the growing population of the Philippines, we need more areas to establish subdivisions. Unfortunately, the development of residential areas often negatively impacts bird diversity. In an effort to help guide this so-called “progress”, we assessed the avifauna of three subdivisions with increasing woodland areas: (1) Beverly Hills, the most populated and degraded subdivision with nearly 70% grassland areas; (2) Maharlika Hills, which retained a decent although broken woodland cover; and (3) Fairmount Hills which has enjoyed the protection of environmentally-conscious homeowners who have zealously guarded their woodland and have even set aside a substantial area as a biological preserve.

We conducted transect and mist net surveys from January to March of 2014. Biodiversity indices (Berger-Parker, Simpson’s, and Shannon’s) and cluster analysis (via Multivariate Statistical Package) was done to determine which subdivision held the highest bird diversity and so help in formulating residential development guidelines or policies that our country can adopt in order to make our “march of progress” a truly sustainable one.

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O ral P res ent ati o ns Hi gh Sch oo l

Re-introduction of Awaous melanocephalus Bleeker, 1849 (Biang Bato) in three Antipolo streams experiencing graded anthropogenic disturbance

Marina Nicole G. Salvador, Paulina Danice A. Cedro, Ana Rafaella U. Aligaen, Vincent Paul W. Valera Jr., Nikko Maurice C. Nackaerts, Edward Vincent C. De Leon and

Young Jun Eom

Holistic Education and Development Center, 95 Beverly Hills, Taytay, Rizzal Email: happy_nicolemsalvador@yahoo.com, ice_101997@yahoo.com, rafaella_

aligaen@yahoo.com, vincent.pwv@yahoo.com, nikknakk008@

yahoo.co.uk, evcdl@yahoo.com, eyoungjun@gmail.com

The commercial and ecological importance of freshwater fish in the Philippines cannot be overstated. Unfortunately, rates of extinction of freshwater fish remain very high.

One of the leading causes is the introduction of exotics. As of 2002, more than forty non-native fish species have been purposefully introduced in Philippine waters for food, recreation and mosquito control. We sought to help reverse this trend by re- introducing the Largesnout Goby, a native of the Laguna De Bay watershed to three Antipolo streams undergoing increasing levels of human disturbance mainly through the disposal of domestic wastes and laundry soap. We first conducted a survey of extant fish species via interview of local fishermen from January to March of 2014.

Various native fishing gear were used (bubo, patanga, and gill net) to augment/confirm the anecdotal species list. Fish caught were identified and a preliminary gut analysis was done to assess the ability of the extant food web to support the goby. The dissolved oxygen, pH, total dissolved solids, conductivity, salinity, and temperature parameters were also monitored. One basin from each of the rivers was selected based on the habitat preferences of the goby. The number of adult individuals released depended on basin morphometry.

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O ral P res ent ati o ns U n d er gr adu ate

Comparison of the diversity of ground-dwelling ants in a forested area and a coconut plantation in Bacon-Manito, Bicol, Philippines

Felipe L. Del Castillo1, Ma. Dolores C. Tongco1 and David M. General2

1Institute of Biology, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City

2UPLB Museum of Natural History, College of Forestry and Natural Resources Campus, University of the Philippines, Los Baños, Laguna

Email: fldelcastillo11@gmail.com, mdc.tongco@gmail.com, bzb43@yahoo.com The difference between a forested area and a coconut plantation (converted from a forested area) in Bacon-Manito, Bicol, Philippines was assessed using ant diversity as an indicator of ecosystem health. Three transect lines with four pitfall traps each were laid out across each site for a total of 12 traps per site. Pitfall trap samples were collected every 24 hours for 3 days. A total of 40 species in 1,194 individuals were obtained from both sites. Twenty- two species were collected from the coconut plantation, while 27 species were collected from the forested area, with 9 species shared by both sites. Jaccard’s classic similarity index, Sorensen’s classic qualitative similarity coefficient, and Bray-Curtis (Sorensen’s quantitative) index yielded similarities of 22.5%, 36.7%, and 14.0%, respectively, for the ant species composition of the two sites. For the coconut plantation, the Shannon’s diversity index and Simpson’s diversity index were 2.114 and 0.8145, respectively, while it was 2.482 and 0.8678, respectively, for the forested site. Shannon’s diversity t-test showed a significant difference between the two sites, with the forested area having higher ant diversity when compared to the coconut plantation. These results implied a change in composition of ant species in the coconut plantation, resulting in lower diversity, which suggests a less robust ecosystem.

Diversity, distribution, and habitat association of amphibian fauna of Bunawan, Agusan del Sur with implications for conservation of forest-associated threatened

and endemic taxa

Jaymar M. Falcasantos and Adam Roy V.Galolo Caraga State Univesity, Ampayon,Butuan City

Email: falcasantosjaymar@yahoo.com, charitoblitz@yahoo.com

Philippines has been considered as the major center of amphibian diversity and endemism yet the country’s amphibian diversity remains underestimated and under threat. This is the case of Brgy. San Andres and Tagbayangbang, Bunawan, Agusan del Sur in which amphibian fauna is still unassessed and under threat from habitat conversion and mining.

The current study employed transects line and time constrained survey to assess the species diversity, abundance and habitat distribution and preference of amphibian fauna. Twelve 100 – km transects were established on each site across habitat disturbance gradients – secondary forest, cultivated, grassland and small-scale mining area. Finding revealed a diverse array of twenty six amphibian species, 60% of which are Philippine endemics and 15% are endemic to Mindanao. Amphibian diversity was slightly higher at Tagbayangbang (H’ = 2.60) as compared to San Andres (H’ = 2.43). Multivariate data exploration (CCA) gave high correlations between the amphibian species and habitat variables (18 variables) forming two distinct groups: species that prefer open and seemingly disturbed habitat and species that prefer forested habitat. Amphibians with high conservation value includes the endangered Mindanao endemic Philautus surrufus, six vulnerable species including vulnerable Mindanao endemics – Megophrys stejnegeri, Philautus acutirostris and Limnonectes parvus with rather low relative abundances and mostly associated in forested habitats.

Results suggest that several threatened and endemic species associated on forest habitats are still present in the area yet presently in threat from forest destruction. Additional research encompassing temporal consideration would yield more insights on amphibian faunal diversity in the area.

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O ral P res ent ati o ns U n d er gr adu ate

Species limits and biogeography of Philippine Malkohas (Cuculiformes:Cuculidae) from Luzon Islands and Palawan faunal regions

Estephen B. Fortela and Juan Carlos T. Gonzalez

Institute of Biological Sciences University of the Philippines Los Banos, Brgy. Batong Malake, College, Los Banos, Laguna

Email: fortela.estephen@gmail.com, jctgonzalez@uplb.edu.ph

The Philippine Malkohas consist of three endemic and conservative taxa. However, ambiguities in their classification emerged due to the paucity of evidences. Therefore, this study aims to determine the species limits and review the biogeographic distribution of Philippine Malkohas. Selected subspecies of Phaenicophaeus superciliosus and Phaenicophaeus curvirostris were subjected to the system proposed by Tobias et al. (2010) to score the phenotypic differences between allopatric taxa while samples of the monotypic Dasylophus cumingi were analyzed through Univariate Principal Component Analysis.

Through phenotypic differentiation, one of the possible results is the existence of the new subspecies of the monotypic Phaenicophaeus cumingi. Also, this study may warrant the splitting of the subspecies P.s. cagayanensis from P.s. superciliosus and P.c. harringtoni (Palawan Islands) from P.c. microrhinus (Sarawak Malaysia) and elevate them to species level.

Macrophyte distribution in the littoral zones of Lake Taal

Anna Patricia V. Gerong, Patricia D. Orellana, Chrio A. Sta. Ana, George Louis P.

Caballes,

Kenoses L. Legaspi, Jonathan Carlo A. Briones and Rey Donne S. Papa University of Santo Tomas, España Blvd., Sampaloc, Manila

Email: trish.gerong@yahoo.com.ph, trixao@yahoo.com, chrio21@yahoo.com, kenoses_

legaspi@yahoo.com, jonathancarlo@ymail.com, rspapa@mnl.ust.edu.ph

Macrophytes play an important role in the aquatic ecosystem since they are good bioindicators and serve as habitat for littoral fishes. This research involves the use of the hydroacoustic method in determining the distribution and abundance of macrophytes in the littoral zones of Lake Taal. Visual observation quantification of macrophyte cover was done by surveying established quadrats in the littoral zones. This was done to identify submerged macrophyte species in Lake Taal and generate a distribution map.

Based on the surveys, five macrophyte species were present in Lake Taal. Furthermore, denser macrophyte beds were concentrated in the south basin of Lake Taal. Nutrient levels in the south basin also contributed to heavy macrophyte growth in this area. These nutrients usually come from run-offs from the watershed from residential, commercial, and agricultural areas. The lesser number of macrophytes in the north basin was due to clearing activities due to the construction of fish cages for aquaculture. Furthermore, we were able to observe that there were different dominant species in the north and south basins of the lake, with Najas indica being more prominent in the north basin, while Vallisneria nana was more common in the south. This study shows that anthropogenic sources of excess nutrients and other activities such as aquaculture play a role in altering the distribution of macrophytes in Lake Taal and how these can have potential detrimental impacts to the littoral zones of the lake.

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O ral P res ent ati o ns U n d er gr adu ate

Diversity and diurnal roosting preferences of cave-dwelling bats in Barangay Plazan and Lower Itil, Balabagan, Lanao del Sur, Philippines

Johaimen M. Maca-alang, Bradley Bob V. Dela Calzada, Dennis A. Warguez and Daisy Lou L. Polestico

Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Mathematics, Mindanao State University-Iligan Institute of Technology, Tibanga, Iligan City

Email: johaimen.macaalang@gmail.com, bradleybobdelacalzada@yahoo.com, denwarguez@gmail.com, daisylou.polestico@g.msuiit.edu.ph

The diversity and daytime roosting preferences of bats in selected caves of Balabagan, Lanao del Sur were determined from May 28-31 and October 29 - November 5, 2013.

Physical parameters and population estimate of each roosting site were also observed.

Results yielded a total of 133 individuals belonging to six species namely Eonycteris spelaea, Rousettus amplexicaudatus, Miniopterus schreibersii, Miniopterus australis, Hipposideros diadema and Rhinolophus arcuatus-s. R. amplexicaudatus preferred to roost in totally dark ceilings while E. spelaea was observed to inhabit in partially illuminated to total dark ceiling, crevices and cracks. M. australis and M. schreibersi were found to co-exist with each other on ceilings, walls and chambers where there is no illumination. H. diadema, species with lowest population estimate, was found to cling on chambers where there is a total absence of light while R. arcuatus-s, species with the highest population estimate, tends to roost in a totally dark ceilings and walls. Degree of illumination and type of reliefs are the factors that affect the daytime roosting selections of bats. Information on cave-dwelling bats is highly important since it will serve as basis for the formulation of guidelines in managing caves and its wildlife inhabitants.

Habitat use and foraging behavior of Golden Yellow White-eye (Zosterops nigrorum catarmanensis) in Camiguin Island, Northern Mindanao

Kimberly Ma. R. Mendoza, Dennis A. Warguez, Lisa Marie J. Paguntalan and Philip Godfrey C. Jakosalem

1Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science and Mathematics, MSU – IIT, Tibanga, Iligan City

2Philippine Biodiversity Conservation Foundation (PBCFI), Bacolod City Email: ezerkimee@gmail.com, denwarguez@gmail.com, lisa.paguntalan@gmail.com,

godo.jakosalem@gmail.com

Data on the habitat use and foraging behavior of the Golden Yellow White-eye Zosterops nigrorum catarmanensis were collected in Mt. Timpoong, Camiguin Island, specifically in the locality of Sitio Lasak-Lasak (primary montane forest) from May 24-30, 2013. A total of 46 point counts was used in surveying bird activity. A 20 m radius plot centered on each point count was selected for habitat sampling. Mann-Whitney test was used to explore differences in habitat requirements and foraging behavior with respect to diurnal variation (AM/PM). Results show that there was a significant difference in the plant height, vegetation cover, and flock size with respect to diurnal variation which indicate dependability of certain feeding behavior and food preference on a particular period of the day. The Golden yellow white-eye preferred habitats with vegetation of thick canopy cover at high altitude. Fruits were the most consumed food type with branches as the frequently used foraging substrate. Although the White-eye’s current conservation status is “Least Concern,” prevalent habitat degradation and hunting remains a threat to its population. The additional information on its habitat requirements and feeding ecology serve as an important basis for the formulation of guidelines in protecting the Golden Yellow White-eye and its habitat.

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O ral P res ent ati o ns U n d er gr adu ate

Microhabitat of the Philippine Tarsier, Tarsius syrichta, (Linn. 1758) in a semi-captive environment in Corella, Bohol, Philippines Quennie Ann Uy, Therese Elaine B. Enad, Noel D. Roble, and Julie B. Otadoy Department of Biology, University of San Carlos, Nasipit, Talamban, Cebu City,

Philippines

Email: quennie.ae.uy@gmail.com, therese_scihi16@yahoo.com, ndr685@yahoo.com, juliebotadoy@gmail.com,

Although there have been significant gains in scientific knowledge about the home range, habitat associations, and social behavior of the wild Philippine tarsiers in the recent years, there is still little progress in the development of captive breeding programs. This study provides data on the characteristics of the microhabitat of the Philippine tarsier, Tarsius syrichta, in a 1.7 ha semi-captive environment of the 174 ha Philippine Tarsier Sanctuary in Corella, Bohol. Microhabitat characterization was done during the summer of 2012 by:

quantifying the flora and fauna; identifying the sleeping sites; and determining the physical parameters such as light intensity, relative humidity, and air temperature. Up to 5 tarsiers were observed during the entire study. Results showed that tarsier individuals occupied microhabitats with relatively similar sleeping site characteristics, relative humidity, light intensity, and air temperature. Each microhabitat consists generally of small-diameter shrubs with diameter of 1 to 10 cm at breast height. Sleeping sites were recorded to have a mean diameter of 2.28 cm and a mean height of 1.61 m above the ground. Despite similar characteristics of microhabitat vegetation, the sleeping sites are not plant-species specific but may be related to the presence of vertical supports with diameters >1 cm. Vertical position for sleeping was commonly used by T. syrichta individuals. Whereas sitting position was most frequently used by expectant mothers, suggesting that availability of supports viable for sitting position is crucial for pregnant T. syrichta individuals.

Spider diversity in the Owl’s nest area in the University of the Philippines, Diliman

Kevin John A. Verona, Ma. Dolores C. Tongco, and Aimee Lyn Barrion-Dupo Institute of Biology, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City Email: kevinjohnverona93_10@yahoo.com, mdctongco@gmail.com, aranea95@yahoo.

com

Spiders compose the largest carnivorous invertebrate group in terrestrial habitats in both natural and urban settings, entailing a major ecological role in both environments.

These invertebrates have not been previously studied within an urban area with extensive green spaces such as the University of the Philippines, Diliman. Shrub-level and ground- dwelling spiders from three 5 m x 5 m plots in Owl’s Nest, an urban reforested patch dominated by mahogany trees (Swietenia macrophylla), were sampled using beat net and pitfall trap methods, respectively. For each plot, 20 trees were beaten and 5 pitfall traps were installed. From 124 specimens obtained, the samples were classified into 9 families, 26 genera and 33 species. The most dominant family was Tetragnathidae, which comprised 55% of the total sample, while the most dominant species were Opadometa grata (Guérin) (25%), Leucauge argentina (Van Hasselt) (13.71%) and Tylorida ventralis (Thorell) (10.48%).

The following diversity index values were obtained: Shannon-Weiner Index = 2.866, Simpsons Index (D) = 0.1031 and Margalef Richness Index = 6.639. Results showed moderate species richness but with high dominance of O. grata in shrub-level vegetation.

Considering the relatively small area (approximately 200 m2), the number of obtained species was high. In addition to this, two new Philippine records (species Opadometa grata and genus Cispius sp.) and one possibly new species (Pseudopoda sp.) were collected in this

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